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About MN onAir

This Minnesota onAir hub supports its citizens to become more informed about and engaged in federal and state politics while facilitating more civil and positive discussions with their representatives, candidates, and fellow Minnesotans.

  • Minnesota onAir is one of 50 state governance and elections hubs that the US onAir Network is providing to reinvigorate our imperiled democracy.
  • Virginia onAir is US onAir’s model of how a state’s onAir Council and curators can enhance a state Hub with fresh Top News and state legislature content, moderated discussions, and production of zoom aircasts with committees, interviews and debates with candidates, and presentations.

For more information  about the many opportunities to learn about and engage with this Minnesota onAir hub, go to this US onAir post on the US onAir central hub.

Our two minute vision video about the US onAir network is below.

Streaming onAir

Minnesota government livestreams

http://www.leg.state.mn.us/

Upcoming Livestreams
None scheduled

Recent livestreams:

Senate Committee aircasts

These aircasts will be focused on the recent activities of House committees during the 2021 General Assembly. Committee chairs will host these aircasts with members of their committees and their invited audience.

Aircasts are Zoom meetings with a host, featured guests, and an online audience livestreamed to the public and archived as YouTube videos in this Hub and YouTube channel.

Here is an example an aircast on a state committee (Virginia).

House Committee aircasts

These aircasts will be focused on the recent activities of House committees during the 2021 General Assembly. Committee chairs will host these aircasts with members of their committees and their invited audience.

Aircasts are Zoom meetings with a host, featured guests, and an online audience livestreamed to the public and archived as YouTube videos in this Hub and YouTube channel.

Here is an example an aircast on a state committee (Virginia).

About the US onAir Network
June 6, 2021 (02:00)

Minnesota News

What happened over the past four-and-a-half months at the Minnesota Capitol
Minnesota Reformer, Max Nesterak| Ricardo Lopez May 21, 2021 (Short)

Instead, lawmakers adjourned on Monday announcing only a broad “numbers-only” budget that still needs to be crafted and passed by June 30 or force the state into a partial government shutdown.

Faced with an $883 million budget deficit, a state in the middle of the COVID-19 pandemic and uncertainty around a federal government bailout, Minnesota leaders were ready to fight over potential cuts to state government and perhaps new tax increases.

Reformer Radio · The chaotic and unproductive 2021 session
Legislative leaders effectively extended their own deadline, buying just two more weeks to finish their work but still claimed victory despite the billions of dollars still left to appropriate.

Just enough: Minnesota will retain eight congressional districts
Minnesota Reformer, Laura Olson| Rilyn EischensApril 26, 2021 (Short)

After months of delays, the U.S. Census Bureau on Monday gave states part of the critical data needed to redraw their U.S. House boundaries: an updated tally of how many people live within their borders, and the number of House districts that each state will have for the next decade.

Minnesotans — especially politicos who’ve been awaiting the news for months — breathed a sigh of relief, as the North Star State will retain its eight congressional districts, earning the 435th seat in Congress by beating out New York state by a mere 89 people.

The news from the 2020 Census count came as a surprise. Minnesota has long been projected to lose a seat due to its slow-growing population. Dropping from eight to seven congressional seats would have diminished Minnesota’s political clout and likely reduced federal spending here going forward.

2021 Legislature

What happened over the past four-and-a-half months at the Minnesota Capitol
Minnesota Reformer, Max Nesterak| Ricardo Lopez May 25, 2021 (Short)

Instead, lawmakers adjourned on Monday announcing only a broad “numbers-only” budget that still needs to be crafted and passed by June 30 or force the state into a partial government shutdown.

Faced with an $883 million budget deficit, a state in the middle of the COVID-19 pandemic and uncertainty around a federal government bailout, Minnesota leaders were ready to fight over potential cuts to state government and perhaps new tax increases.

Reformer Radio · The chaotic and unproductive 2021 session
Legislative leaders effectively extended their own deadline, buying just two more weeks to finish their work but still claimed victory despite the billions of dollars still left to appropriate.

The Minnesota Legislature is the bicameral legislature of the U.S. state of Minnesota consisting of two houses: the Senate and the House of Representatives. Senators are elected from 67 single-member districts. In order to account for decennial redistricting, members run for one two-year term and two four-year terms each decade. They are elected for four-year terms in years ending in 2 and 6, and for two-year terms in years ending in 0. Representatives are elected for two-year terms from 134 single-member districts formed by dividing the 67 senate districts in half. It is the only state legislature in the country to be split with the Republicans controlling the state senate and the democrats controlling the state house.

Both houses of the Legislature meet between January and the first Monday following the third Saturday in May each year, not to exceed 120 legislative days per biennium. Floor sessions are held in the Minnesota State Capitol in Saint Paul.

Voting in Minnesota

Federal & state elections on the ballot:  8 US House members, Governor, and State Senate and House members

Ballot measures:

The Minnesota Division of Elections & Voting, part of the Secretary of State, oversees all Minnesota elections.

2022 Elections

Just enough: Minnesota will retain eight congressional districts
Minnesota Reformer, Laura Olson| Rilyn EischensApril 26, 2021 (Short)

After months of delays, the U.S. Census Bureau on Monday gave states part of the critical data needed to redraw their U.S. House boundaries: an updated tally of how many people live within their borders, and the number of House districts that each state will have for the next decade.

Minnesotans — especially politicos who’ve been awaiting the news for months — breathed a sigh of relief, as the North Star State will retain its eight congressional districts, earning the 435th seat in Congress by beating out New York state by a mere 89 people.

The news from the 2020 Census count came as a surprise. Minnesota has long been projected to lose a seat due to its slow-growing population. Dropping from eight to seven congressional seats would have diminished Minnesota’s political clout and likely reduced federal spending here going forward.

Covid-19

Minnesota Dept. of Health COVID-19
April 22, 2021

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uPzF2o62iao

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R Wittman
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E Luria
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B Scott
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D McEachin
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D Riggleman
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B Cline
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A Spanberger
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D Beyer
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M Griffith
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