Summary

Current Position: US Representative of MN District 2 since 2019
Affiliation: Democrat
District:  south Twin Cities metro area and contains all of Scott, Dakota, and Le Sueur counties. It also contains part of northern and eastern Rice County including the city of Northfield, as well as southern Washington County including the city of Cottage Grove. Lakeville and Eagan are the largest cities in the district 
Upcoming Election:

Craig worked in journalism and corporate communications. She moved to Minnesota in 2005 for a job at St. Jude Medical. Craig first ran for Congress in 2016, losing to Jason Lewis, whom she defeated in their 2018 rematch.[1]

Craig is the first openly LGBT+ member of Congress from Minnesota and the first lesbian mother to serve in Congress.

Featured Quote: 
This week, I was proud to receive the 2021 Retiree Hero Award from @ActiveRetirees
for my 100% pro-retiree voting record in Congress. I’ll always work to ensure our nation’s seniors receive the benefits they’ve earned and deserve.

The Equality Act: Rep. Angie Craig

OnAir Post: Angie Craig MN-02

News

About

Source: Government page

Angie Craig 1Rep. Angie Craig represents Minnesota’s Second Congressional District. She is fighting for working families – and for a Minnesota where every member of every family gets a fair shot. That means a future with lower health care costs and opportunities for career skills and technical training for 21st century jobs. She’ll work with anybody – and take on the Washington establishment – to get things done for her constituents.

Rep. Craig learned the value of hard work from her mother, a single mom who raised three children while earning her teaching degree. She too worked two jobs to help put herself through college. Years later, she moved to Minnesota and fell in love with the strong communities and quality of life. She and her wife Cheryl Greene have four sons – three who have already graduated from college or tech school and one graduating from Rosemount High School in 2021. They lived in Eagan for nearly a decade and recently moved to Prior Lake. Angie attends church in Apple Valley and is a Rotarian who has served on several local community boards over the years. She is a small business investor, the former head of Global HR and Corporate Relations for a major Minnesota manufacturer, and a former newspaper reporter.

In Congress, Rep. Craig is fighting to make sure career skills and technical education is an option for every young person; to lower the cost of healthcare and to work toward a solution that expands health care to many more Americans; for infrastructure investments that benefit our communities – big and small; and for policies that reward people for their hard work – especially family farmers and small business owners. She plans to pursue these priorities through her appointments on the House Committees on Agriculture, Energy and Commerce and Small Business. But she knows she can’t do it alone. Through regular town hall meetings and work in the district, Rep. Craig hopes to hear from you directly about how she can help deliver economic opportunity to every Minnesotan.

Personal

Full Name: Angela ‘Angie’ Dawn Craig

Gender: Female

Family: Wife: Cheryl; 4 Children: Josh, Jonas, Jacob, Isaac

Birth Date: 02/14/1972

Birth Place: West Helena, AR

Home City: Eagan, MN

Religion: Lutheran

Source: Vote Smart

Education

BA, Journalism, University of Memphis, 1994

Political Experience

Representative, United States House of Representatives, District 2, 2019-present

Candidate, United States House of Representatives, Minnesota, District 2, 2016, 2022

Professional Experience

Director, Saint Jude’s Global Human Resources Group, 2011-present

Journalist/Newspaper Reporter

Global Human Resources Leader, Saint Jude Medical, 2005-2015

Offices

Washington, DC Office
2442 Rayburn HOB
Washington, DC 20515
(202) 225-2271

Burnsville Office
12940 Harriet Avenue S.
Suite 238
Burnsville, MN 55337
(651) 846-2120

Contact

Email: Government

Web Links

Politics

Source: none

Election Results

To learn more, go to this wikipedia section in this post.

Finances

Source: Open Secrets

Committees

Caucuses 

New Legislation

Learn more about legislation sponsored and co-sponsored by Representative Craig.

Issues

Source: Government page

Learn about news and information related to agriculture.

Learn about news and information related to communications and technology.

Learn about news and information related to education.

Learn about news and information related to environment.

Learn about news and information related to housing.

Learn about news and information related to jobs and the economy.

Learn about news and information related to health care.

Learn about news and information related to government reform.

The federal government has no place interfering in the decisions between a woman and her doctor, criminalizing abortion or enacting arbitrary laws that undermine women’s reproductive freedoms.

Learn about news and information related to seniors’ issues.

Learn about news and information related to small businesses.

Local law enforcement officers put their lives on the line to protect and serve their communities – oftentimes working on strained budgets without the equipment and training they need to reduce crime and keep Minnesotans safe.

Learn about news and information related to transportation and infrastructure.

Learn about news and information related to veterans.

More Information

Services

Source: Government page

District

Source: Wikipedia

Minnesota’s 2nd congressional district covers the south Twin Cities metro area and contains all of Scott, Dakota, and Le Sueur counties. It also contains part of northern and eastern Rice County including the city of Northfield, as well as southern Washington County including the city of Cottage Grove. Lakeville and Eagan are the largest cities in the district. Historically, for many decades in the mid 20th century the 2nd congressional district covered the southwest corner of the state, while the 1st congressional district covered most of this part of the state.

Three of Minnesota’s most important rivers run through the district, the Mississippi River, the Minnesota River, and the St. Croix River. Interstate highways I-35 E and I-35 W merge in the district in addition to the north–south thoroughfares of U.S. Routes 169, 61, and 52 and the east–west Route 212. The suburban areas in the northern part of the district blend into the rural farmland in the south. The district’s economy includes agriculture, small businesses, and large corporations.

Some of the largest employers in the district are Thomson Reuters, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota, 3M, Cambria, and Red Wing Shoes. The district includes Pine Bend Refinery, the largest oil refinery in Minnesota, owned by Koch Industries.

The 2nd district is also home to two private liberal arts colleges: St. Olaf and Carleton, both in Northfield. Shakopee is home to Minnesota’s largest amusement park, Valleyfair, as well as Canterbury Park.

Two of Minnesota’s oldest cities, Hastings and Red Wing are in the district. The district hosts heritage festivals and town celebrations, such as Kolacky days in Montgomery, the Pine Island Cheese festival, and Shakopee Derby Days.

Minnesota’s 2nd congressional district is currently represented by Democrat Angie Craig, who defeated incumbent Republican Jason Lewis in the 2018 election. The district is considered to be highly competitive.

Wikipedia

Angela Dawn Craig (born February 14, 1972) is an American politician, retired journalist, and former businesswoman. A member of the Democratic–Farmer–Labor Party (DFL), she has served as the U.S. representative from Minnesota’s 2nd congressional district since 2019. The district includes most of the southern suburbs of the Twin Cities and outlying rural areas to the southwest.

Born and raised in Arkansas, Craig worked in journalism and corporate communications. She moved to Minnesota in 2005 for a job at St. Jude Medical. Craig first ran for Congress in 2016, losing to Jason Lewis, whom she defeated in their 2018 rematch.[1]

Craig is the first openly LGBT+ member of Congress from Minnesota and the first lesbian mother to serve in Congress.[2]

Early life and career

Craig was born in West Helena, Arkansas, in 1972.[3][4] She graduated from Nettleton High School in Jonesboro[5] and earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism from the University of Memphis.[6]

After college, Craig interned at The Commercial Appeal and became a full-time reporter.[7] She lived in London from 2002 through 2005,[4][8] and worked at St. Jude Medical in human resources and communications from 2005 to 2017.[9][10][11]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

2016

Angie Craig in 2016

In 2016, Craig ran for the United States House of Representatives in Minnesota’s 2nd congressional district.[12] She announced her candidacy before Republican incumbent John Kline announced his retirement.[10] She faced no opposition in the Democratic primary. In the general election, she faced former conservative talk show host Jason Lewis.[12] She lost by fewer than 7,000 votes.

2018

Craig sought a rematch with Lewis in 2018.[9] As in 2016, she was unopposed in the Democratic primary. In the general election, she defeated Lewis, whose candor was felt to be his eventual undoing. Regarding slavery, for instance, he said in 2016, “If you don’t want to own a slave, don’t, but don’t tell other people they can’t.”[13]

Craig is the first openly lesbian mother to be elected to Congress, the first woman to be elected in Minnesota’s 2nd district, and the first openly gay person elected to Congress from Minnesota.[14][15] She received 52.6% of the vote, winning three of the six counties in the district.[16][17] When she took office on January 3, 2019, she became the first DFLer to represent this district since it was reconfigured as a south suburban district in 2003.

2020

In a verified recording, Legal Marijuana Now Party nominee Adam Weeks said that Republican operatives offered him $15,000 to run for Congress in the 2nd district in order to “pull votes away” from Craig. Weeks said, “They want me to run as a third-party, liberal candidate, which I’m down. I can play the liberal, you know that.”[18][19] Leaders of prominent pro-marijuana legalization groups Minnesotans for Responsible Marijuana Regulation, Sensible Change Minnesota, and Minnesota NORML condemned the GOP strategy as “unconscionable”.[18]

In late September, Weeks died of a drug overdose, throwing the election into chaos. Minnesota law requires a special election if a major-party nominee dies within 79 days of Election Day. The law was enacted to prevent a repeat of the circumstances of the 2002 U. S. Senate election, in which incumbent Paul Wellstone died 11 days before the general election. Since the Legal Marijuana Now Party was a major party in Minnesota (by virtue of its 2018 candidate for state auditor winning five percent of the vote), the 2nd District race was set to be postponed to February 9, 2021.[20] Craig sued to keep the election on November 3, arguing that the requirement for a special election could leave the 2nd district without representation for almost a month, and also violated federal election law.[21] Republican nominee Tyler Kistner joined the Minnesota Secretary of State as a defendant. The federal judge hearing the case ruled for Craig, noting that federal election law barred moving the date of House elections in all but a few circumstances. Kistner appealed to the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals, which also sided with Craig. The appeals court held that the death of a candidate from a party with “modest electoral strength” could not justify postponing the election. After Kistner’s appeal to the Supreme Court was rejected, the election was cleared to continue as scheduled on November 3.[19][22][23][24][25]

2022

In the 2022 election, Craig defeated Republican nominee Tyler Kistner in a rematch of the 2020 election[26] with 51% of the vote.[27]

Tenure

Angie Craig at a campaign event in Apple Valley, Minnesota
Craig at a campaign event in Apple Valley, Minnesota

According to the McCourt School of Public Policy at Georgetown University, Craig held a Bipartisan Index Score of 0.3 in the 116th United States Congress for 2019, placing her 114th out of 435 members.[28]

During Donald Trump‘s presidency, Craig voted in line with Trump’s stated position 5.5% of the time.[29] In the 117th Congress, she voted in line with Joe Biden‘s stated position 100% of the time.[30] Craig broke more frequently with the Biden administration in 2023, voting in line with the president’s positions 70.6% of the time, the fourth-lowest rate of any House member in the Democratic Caucus.[31]

On February 25, 2022, Craig introduced the Affordable Insulin Now Act, a bill intended to cap out-of-pocket insulin prices at $35 per month. The bill passed the House.[32][33]

On April 27, 2023, Craig’s congressional office announced that its staff would no longer be required to have bachelor’s degrees.[34]

Craig played a role in negotiations for the 2024 United States federal budget, in which the far-right Freedom Caucus has demanded deep spending cuts and refused to work with House Speaker Kevin McCarthy. In response to the intraparty dispute, on September 20, 2023, Craig introduced the MCCARTHY (My Constituents Cannot Afford Rebellious Tantrums, Handle Your) Shutdown Act, which proposes that members’ pay be withheld for each day that a federal government shutdown lasts.[35]

Committee assignments

For the 118th Congress:[36]

Caucus memberships

Political positions

On February 1, 2023, Craig was one of 12 Democrats to vote for a resolution to end the COVID-19 national emergency.[41][42]

Craig voted to provide Israel with support following the 2023 Hamas attack on Israel.[43][44]

On July 6, 2024, Craig called for Biden not to run for reelection. She was the first battleground district member to do so.[45]

Electoral history

Minnesota’s 2nd congressional district, 2022[46]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic (DFL)Angie Craig (incumbent) 165,581 50.87
RepublicanTyler Kistner148,57845.65
Legal Marijuana NowPaula M. Overby10,7303.30
Write-in5850.18
Total votes325,474 100.0
Democratic (DFL) hold
Minnesota’s 2nd congressional district, 2020[47]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic (DFL)Angie Craig (incumbent) 204,031 48.18
RepublicanTyler Kistner194,46645.92
Legal Marijuana NowAdam Charles Weeks24,6935.83
Write-in2700.06
Total votes423,460 100.0
Democratic (DFL) hold
Minnesota’s 2nd congressional district, 2018[48]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic (DFL)Angie Craig 177,958 52.66
RepublicanJason Lewis (incumbent)159,34447.15
Write-in6660.20
Total votes337,968 100.0
Democratic (DFL) gain from Republican
Minnesota’s 2nd congressional district, 2016[49]
PartyCandidateVotes%
RepublicanJason Lewis 173,970 46.95
Democratic (DFL)Angie Craig167,31545.16
IndependencePaula Overby28,8697.79
Write-in3600.10
Total votes370,514 100.0
Republican hold

Personal life

In 2020, Craig moved to Prior Lake, Minnesota, after living in Eagan, Minnesota, for nearly 10 years.[50] She and her wife, Cheryl Greene, were married in 2008 and have four sons, who were teenagers during her first run for Congress in 2016.[51][52]

Craig is a Lutheran.[53]

Craig was physically assaulted in the elevator of her Washington, D.C., apartment building on February 9, 2023.[54] The man who assaulted her was sentenced to 27 months in prison.[55]

See also

References

  1. ^ Beifuss, John (November 9, 2018). “Meet the former Commercial Appeal reporter who’s now in Congress”. The Commercial Appeal. Retrieved March 14, 2022.
  2. ^ Wiener, Jon (September 2, 2016). “The Terrible Mini-Trump of Minnesota—and the Progressive Who’s Running Against Him”. The Nation. ISSN 0027-8378. Retrieved March 14, 2022.
  3. ^ “Candidate Conversation – Angie Craig (DFL) | News & Analysis | Inside Elections”. www.insideelections.com. Retrieved November 16, 2018.
  4. ^ a b Montgomery, David (October 7, 2016). “Angie Craig: Adoption struggle shaped 2nd District candidate”. Twincities.com. Retrieved October 19, 2018.
  5. ^ “Angie Craig, former Memphis Commercial Appeal reporter, now in Congress”. Commercialappeal.com. November 9, 2018. Retrieved December 20, 2018.
  6. ^ “News”. Hastings Star Gazette. Archived from the original on November 8, 2018. Retrieved October 19, 2018.
  7. ^ Renzetti, Jackie (July 25, 2018). “Voter guide: Angie Craig talks key issues”. Hastings Star Gazette. Archived from the original on October 18, 2018. Retrieved October 19, 2018.
  8. ^ Gessner, John (September 22, 2016). “Eagan resident Angie Craig looks to Washington”. hometownsource.com. Retrieved October 19, 2018.
  9. ^ a b Rao, Maya (August 27, 2018). “In rematch with Jason Lewis, Angie Craig seeks stronger connection with voters”. StarTribune.com. Retrieved October 19, 2018.
  10. ^ a b “Angie Craig officially announces run against Rep. Kline”. MinnPost. April 6, 2015. Retrieved October 19, 2018.
  11. ^ “Second District race: What it would mean to elect a former medical device executive to Congress”. MinnPost. January 26, 2016. Retrieved October 19, 2018.
  12. ^ a b “It’s Jason Lewis vs. Angie Craig in what’s likely to be one of the most-watched congressional races in the country”. MinnPost. August 13, 2016. Retrieved October 19, 2018.
  13. ^ The Terrible Mini-Trump of Minnesota and the Progressive Who’s Running Against Him, Star Tribune, John Weiner, September 2, 2016. Retrieved February 10, 2023.
  14. ^ “LGBTQ Candidates Record Historic Midterm Wins In Rainbow Wave”. Huffingtonpost.com. November 7, 2018. Retrieved November 7, 2018.
  15. ^ Romi Oltuski (October 21, 2018). “If She Wins, Angie Craig Will Be the First Lesbian Mom in Congress”. InStyle. Retrieved November 6, 2018.
  16. ^ “Minnesota Election Results: Second House District”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 31, 2018.
  17. ^ “MN Election Results”. electionresults.sos.state.mn.us. Retrieved December 31, 2018.
  18. ^ a b Before death, pro-marijuana candidate reportedly said GOP recruited him to “pull votes away” from Minnesota Democrat, CBS News, October 29, 2020. Retrieved November 11, 2020.
  19. ^ a b Bierschbach, Briana (October 28, 2020). “Pot party candidate said GOP recruited him to ‘pull votes’ from Minnesota Democrat”. Minneapolis Star Tribune. Vol. XXXIX, no. 207. Retrieved November 11, 2020.
  20. ^ Van Berkel, Jessie (September 28, 2020). “Rep. Angie Craig files lawsuit over delay of Second Congressional District race”. Minneapolis Star Tribune. Vol. XXXIX, no. 178. Retrieved November 13, 2020.
  21. ^ Van Oot, Torey; Condon, Patrick (October 10, 2020). “Judge blocks delay of Minnesota congressional race”. Minneapolis Star Tribune. Vol. XXXIX, no. 189. Retrieved November 13, 2020.
  22. ^ Van Berkel, Jessie (October 23, 2020). “Minnesota’s 2nd Congressional District election stays on Nov. 3, Appeals Court rules”. Minneapolis Star Tribune. Vol. XXXIX, no. 203. Retrieved November 13, 2020.
  23. ^ Brian Bakst (October 9, 2020). “Judge: Winner of CD2 race must be decided in November”. Minnesota Public Radio.
  24. ^ Brian Bakst (October 23, 2020). “Appeals court rules 2nd district race should proceed”. Minnesota Public Radio.
  25. ^ “Angie Craig vs. Tyler Kistner in 2nd Congressional District rematch”. kare11.com. November 4, 2022.
  26. ^ “Minnesota Second Congressional District Election Results”. The New York Times. November 8, 2022. Retrieved December 8, 2022.
  27. ^ “The Lugar Center – McCourt School Bipartisan Index House Scores 116th Congress First Session (2019)” (PDF). Georgetown University. Retrieved May 20, 2020.
  28. ^ “Tracking Congress In The Age Of Trump – Angie Craig”. ABC News. January 30, 2017. Retrieved May 20, 2020.
  29. ^ Bycoffe, Anna Wiederkehr and Aaron (April 22, 2021). “Does Your Member Of Congress Vote With Or Against Biden?”. FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved June 1, 2022.
  30. ^ Yang, Tia; Burton, Cooper. “How often every member of Congress voted with Biden in 2023”. ABC News. Retrieved July 5, 2024.
  31. ^ Craig, Angie (February 25, 2022). “H.R.6833 – 117th Congress (2021-2022): Affordable Insulin Now Act”. www.congress.gov. Retrieved March 30, 2022.
  32. ^ Tribune, Hunter Woodall Star. “U.S. House passes Rep. Angie Craig’s bill limiting insulin costs”. Star Tribune. Retrieved June 7, 2022.
  33. ^ Spewak, Danny (April 27, 2023). “Rep. Angie Craig drops college requirement for staffers”. kare11.com. Archived from the original on April 28, 2023. Retrieved April 28, 2023.
  34. ^ Hall, Madison (September 21, 2023). “A Democratic representative just introduced the ‘My Constituents Cannot Afford Rebellious Tantrums, Handle Your Shutdown Act’ to halt congressional pay during a government shutdown”. Business Insider. Retrieved September 22, 2023.
  35. ^ “Angie Craig”. Clerk of the United States House of Representatives. Retrieved August 7, 2023.
  36. ^ “Join the Congressional LGBT Equality Caucus – DearColleague.us”. Retrieved February 8, 2019.
  37. ^ “Members”. New Democrat Coalition. Archived from the original on February 8, 2018. Retrieved February 5, 2018.
  38. ^ “Members”. House Pro Choice Caucus. August 19, 2021.
  39. ^ “Congressional Coalition on Adoption Institute”.
  40. ^ “House passes resolution to end COVID-19 national emergency”. February 2023.
  41. ^ “On Passage – H.J.RES.7: Relating to a national emergency declared by”. August 12, 2015.
  42. ^ Demirjian, Karoun (October 25, 2023). “House Declares Solidarity With Israel in First Legislation Under New Speaker”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved October 30, 2023.
  43. ^ Washington, U. S. Capitol Room H154; p:225-7000, DC 20515-6601 (October 25, 2023). “Roll Call 528 Roll Call 528, Bill Number: H. Res. 771, 118th Congress, 1st Session”. Office of the Clerk, U.S. House of Representatives. Retrieved October 30, 2023.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: numeric names: authors list (link)
  44. ^ Carney, Jordan; Ward, Myah; Diaz, Daniella (July 6, 2024). “Angie Craig becomes first battleground Dem to call for Biden to withdraw”. Politico. Retrieved July 10, 2024.
  45. ^ “State General Election 2022 − Results for U.S. Representative District 2”. Minnesota Secretary of State. November 9, 2022. Retrieved November 9, 2020.
  46. ^ “State General Election 2020 − Results for U.S. Representative District 2”. Minnesota Secretary of State. November 12, 2020. Retrieved November 12, 2020.
  47. ^ “State General Election 2018 – Results for U.S. Representative District 2”. Minnesota Secretary of State. November 6, 2018. Retrieved May 4, 2020.
  48. ^ “State General Election 2016 – Results for U.S. Representative District 2”. Minnesota Secretary of State. November 8, 2016. Retrieved May 4, 2020.
  49. ^ “About”. Representative Angie Craig. December 3, 2012. Retrieved May 23, 2022.
  50. ^ The Terrible Mini-Trump of Minnesota—and the Progressive Who’s Running Against Him, The Nation, Jon Weiner, September 2, 2016. Retrieved February 10, 2023.
  51. ^ Angie Craig [@RepAngieCraig] (October 25, 2022). “What a journey together. Happy 14th wedding anniversary today to the best wife, mother and grandmother” (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  52. ^ “Religious affiliation of members of 118th Congress” (PDF). Pew Research Center. Archived (PDF) from the original on March 16, 2023. Retrieved February 14, 2023.
  53. ^ Rep. Angie Craig assaulted in apartment building elevator, her office says, CNBC, Kevin Breuninger, February 9, 2023. Retrieved February 10, 2023.
  54. ^ Lybrand, Holmes (November 16, 2023). “Man who attacked Rep. Angie Craig in DC apartment building sentenced to 27 months in prison | CNN Politics”. CNN. Retrieved May 6, 2024.
U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Minnesota’s 2nd congressional district

2019–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States representatives by seniority
233rd
Succeeded by