Jim HagedornJim Hagedorn – MN1

Current Position: US Representative for MN District 1 since 2019
Affiliation: Republican

Other Positions:  
Ranking Member, Underserved, Agricultural, and Rural Business Development

Featured Quote: 
This administration refuses to prioritize national security and the safety of Americans. In fact, Biden opened the border and reinstated catch and release on purpose. It’s time for @POTUS and @VP to accept responsibility for this crisis, put America First, and secure our borders.

Featured Video: 
Farm Connections (1405) Jim Hagedorn, Virginia Bissen

Source: Wikipedia

Hagedorn facing U.S. House ethics investigation over office spending
St. Paul Pioneer Press, STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS September 7, 2021 (Short)

The House Ethics Committee announced Tuesday that it is investigating four members, including Rep. Jim Hagedorn, a Republican representing southern Minnesota.

According to CQ-Roll Call, the cases were investigated by the nonpartisan Office of Congressional Ethics, which concluded that in each case there was a substantial reason to believe that a violation had occurred. The OCE is a fact-finding office and, unlike the Ethics Committee, cannot discipline members or issue subpoenas.

The Minnesota Reformer, an online news site, previously reported on questionable spending by Hagedorn’s office.

U.S. Rep. Jim Hagedorn

“Congressman Hagedorn personally self-reported this matter to the Ethics Committee last year and will continue working with it to bring it to an appropriate conclusion,” Elliot Berke, managing partner of the law firm Berke Farah,said in a statement on behalf of Hagedorn. “The fact that the OCE, which provides non-binding recommendations to the Ethics Committee, decided to investigate something that was already under review was a waste of taxpayer funds and House resources.”

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for MN District 1 since 2019
Affiliation: Republican

Other Positions:  
Ranking Member, Underserved, Agricultural, and Rural Business Development

Featured Quote: 
This administration refuses to prioritize national security and the safety of Americans. In fact, Biden opened the border and reinstated catch and release on purpose. It’s time for @POTUS and @VP to accept responsibility for this crisis, put America First, and secure our borders.

Featured Video: 
Farm Connections (1405) Jim Hagedorn, Virginia Bissen

Source: Wikipedia

News

Hagedorn facing U.S. House ethics investigation over office spending
St. Paul Pioneer Press, STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS September 7, 2021 (Short)

The House Ethics Committee announced Tuesday that it is investigating four members, including Rep. Jim Hagedorn, a Republican representing southern Minnesota.

According to CQ-Roll Call, the cases were investigated by the nonpartisan Office of Congressional Ethics, which concluded that in each case there was a substantial reason to believe that a violation had occurred. The OCE is a fact-finding office and, unlike the Ethics Committee, cannot discipline members or issue subpoenas.

The Minnesota Reformer, an online news site, previously reported on questionable spending by Hagedorn’s office.

U.S. Rep. Jim Hagedorn

“Congressman Hagedorn personally self-reported this matter to the Ethics Committee last year and will continue working with it to bring it to an appropriate conclusion,” Elliot Berke, managing partner of the law firm Berke Farah,said in a statement on behalf of Hagedorn. “The fact that the OCE, which provides non-binding recommendations to the Ethics Committee, decided to investigate something that was already under review was a waste of taxpayer funds and House resources.”

Twitter

About

Jim Hagedorn 1

Source: Government page

Congressman Jim Hagedorn was born in Blue Earth, Minnesota, in 1962, to Tom and Kathleen. His formative years were spent on a 160-acre grain and livestock farm outside of Truman. Jim was part of a rich family tradition of farming, with his father, grandfather and great-grandfather all being southern Minnesota farmers. Jim and his sisters gained a firsthand understanding of farming and small business. He helped work the land, walk the bean fields, feed the hogs, maintain the property and appreciate country living and small town values.

In 1974, Jim’s father was elected to Congress to represent southern Minnesota’s Second Congressional District. Shortly thereafter the family began splitting time between Washington, D.C. and Minnesota – spending the school year in the Virginia suburbs of D.C. and returning each summer to the Truman farm. Through Jim’s unique perspective on national politics, Jim earned respect for notable leaders including Jack Kemp, Henry Hyde and Ronald Reagan, who, along with his father, are Jim’s political heroes.

During high school, Jim saved for college and his first automobile by delivering newspapers, mowing lawns, and teaching tennis as an assistant professional. Beginning at age 18, Jim worked full-time jobs as a busboy and salesman to self-finance his college education. Jim attended George Mason University and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Government and Politics.

In 1984, Jim began serving Minnesota’s Seventh District as Republican Congressman Arlan Stangeland’s legislative assistant. Jim handled an array of issues and successfully managed the Congressman’s legislative agenda, including stewardship of a bipartisan “workfare” bill that required able-bodied welfare recipients to work for benefits. This bill was conceptually enacted into law shortly after Republicans won control of the House of Representatives in 1994.

Jim also brings policy experience to Capitol Hill from time spent as a congressional affairs officer for two U.S. Department of the Treasury agencies as a civil servant. Under his leadership, Jim assisted in the enactment of several efforts to reform government and to drive down costs for the American taxpayer.

On January 3, 2019, Jim was sworn in to represent Minnesota’s First District in the U.S. House of Representatives. The First District includes 21 counties from South Dakota to Wisconsin, along the Iowa border. Jim married Jennifer Carnahan in 2018. He resides in his hometown of Blue Earth and worships at St. Paul Lutheran Church (LCMS) in Blue Earth.

Jim serves on the House Committees on Agriculture and Small Business to promote farming, Main Street enterprises and southern Minnesota’s rural way of life.

Voting Record

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Offices

Washington, DC

1433 Longworth HOB
WashingtonDC 20515

(202) 225-2472

Mankato

11 Civic Center Plaza, Suite 301
MankatoMN 56001

(507) 323-6090

Rochester

1530 Greenview Dr. SW, Ste. 207
RochesterMN 55902

(507) 323-6090
Mondays: 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM
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Wikipedia Entry

James Lee Hagedorn (/ˈhæɡɛdɔːrn/ HAG-e-dorn; born August 4, 1962) is an American politician from the state of Minnesota. A Republican, he is a member of the United States House of Representatives from Minnesota’s 1st congressional district.[1] The district covers much of the southern third of the state and includes Rochester, Austin and Mankato.

Early life and education

Hagedorn was born in Blue Earth, Minnesota, in 1962,[2] the son of former U.S. Representative Tom Hagedorn and Kathleen Hagedorn (née Mittlestadt).[3] He was raised on his family’s farm near Truman, Minnesota, and in McLean, Virginia, near Washington, D.C., while his father served in Congress from 1975 to 1983.[4][5] Hagedorn graduated from Langley High School.[6]

He graduated from George Mason University with a Bachelor of Arts degree in government and political science in 1993.[6][7]

Early political career

Government career

Hagedorn greeting President Ronald Reagan in 1982

Hagedorn served as a legislative aide to U.S. Representative Arlan Stangeland from 1984 to 1991.[6] He then worked in the United States Department of the Treasury as director for legislative and public affairs for the Financial Management Service from 1991 to 1998 and as congressional affairs officer for the Bureau of Engraving and Printing until 2009.[6][8]

Mr. Conservative blog

From 2002 to 2008, Hagedorn authored a now-deleted blog, Mr. Conservative. Blog posts included sexist and Islamophobic comments, complaints about Barack Obama, remarks against Native Americans,[vague] homophobic statements, and anti-Mormon and antisemitic comments.[9] Hagedorn said the blog was intended to be humorous and satirical.[10]

Hagedorn’s blogging history led the Washington Examiner to run an editorial labeling him “the worst midterm candidate in America” in 2018.[11][12]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

2010

Hagedorn lost the Republican nomination for Minnesota’s 1st congressional district in the 2010 election.[6][13][14]

2014

Returning to Minnesota in 2013, he won the Republican nomination, but lost to Democratic incumbent Tim Walz.[15][6]

2014 Republican primary results
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Jim Hagedorn 12,748 54.0
RepublicanAaron Miller10,87046.0
Minnesota’s 1st congressional district, 2014
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic (DFL) Tim Walz (incumbent) 122,851 54.2
RepublicanJim Hagedorn103,53645.7
Write-in3080.1

2016

Hagedorn again won the Republican nomination, but again lost to Walz.[6]

2016 Republican primary results
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Jim Hagedorn 10,851 76.5
RepublicanSteve Williams3,33023.5
Minnesota’s 1st congressional district, 2016
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic (DFL) Tim Walz (incumbent) 169,074 50.3
RepublicanJim Hagedorn166,52649.6
Write-in2770.1

2018

Hagedorn received the Republican nomination, despite the National Rifle Association endorsing another candidate, Carla Nelson, who also received funds from Representatives Elise Stefanik, Richard Uihlein and Paul Singer. Hagedorn described himself as the most conservative candidate, who was loyal to Donald Trump.[16]

2018 Republican primary results
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Jim Hagedorn 25,418 60.1
RepublicanCarla Nelson13,58932.2
RepublicanSteve Williams2,1455.1
RepublicanAndrew Candler1,1062.6

After Hagedorn won the primary, then-head of the National Republican Congressional Committee, Representative Steve Stivers, said “that is news to me” about the viewpoints expressed on Hagedorn’s blog. The NRCC spokeswoman said the posts were inappropriate and not condoned by the group.[17]

In the general election, with Walz giving up the seat to make a successful run for governor of Minnesota, Hagedorn bested Democratic nominee Daniel Feehan.[1]

Minnesota’s 1st congressional district, 2018
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Jim Hagedorn 146,199 50.1
Democratic (DFL)Dan Feehan144,88449.7
Write-in5750.2

2020

Hagedorn was reelected in 2020.

Minnesota’s 1st congressional district, 2020
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Jim Hagedorn (incumbent) 179,234 48.6
Democratic (DFL)Dan Feehan167,89045.5
GrassrootsBill Rood21,4485.8
Write-in2840.1

Tenure

According to the McCourt School of Public Policy at Georgetown University, Hagedorn held a Bipartisan Index Score of -0.0 in the 116th United States Congress for 2019, which placed him 190th out of 435 members.[18] Based on FiveThirtyEight‘s congressional vote tracker at ABC News, Hagedorn voted with Donald Trump‘s stated public policy positions 94.4% of the time,[19] which ranked him average in the 116th United States Congress when predictive scoring (district partisanship and voting record) is used.[20]

In 2020, in response to activist Shaun King saying that depictions of Jesus as white should be destroyed, Hagedorn wrote that the Democratic Party and Black Lives Matter movement “are at war with our country, our beliefs and western culture.” In response to critiques that the term “Western culture” has been used to promote white nationalism, Hagedorn said, “The notion that statues and images of Jesus Christ somehow represent white supremacy and should be destroyed is ludicrous and represent a growing intolerant movement on the left to silence any voices that do not align with their radical secular views.”[21] His comments led several corporate donors, including Intel and UnitedHealth Group, to ask Hagedorn to return their donations.[22][23]

In 2020, LegiStorm released an analysis of Hagedorn’s office spending, finding that the office had spent more than one fifth of its $1.4 million annual office budget on publicly funded constituent mail. Around 40% of his office’s annual budget was spent in the first quarter of 2020, surpassing any other member of Congress during the same time period.[24] Expenses included for Hagedorn’s mailings went to a firm that was partially owned by a part-time Hagedorn staffer.[25] Hagedorn initiated an internal review of his office’s spending and reported the findings to the House Ethics Committee, which declined to pursue the matter.[26] As a result of the internal review, Hagedorn dismissed his chief of staff and said, “I acknowledge responsibility for the oversight of my office and will continue to make any necessary management improvements.”[27][25]

In October 2020, Politico alleged that Hagedorn “appears to have enjoyed rent-free use of a campaign office supplied by a political donor.”[28] Hagedorn denied the report, saying his campaign had leased a post office box and not office space in the building in question.[29]

In December 2020, Hagedorn was one of 126 Republican members of the House of Representatives to sign an amicus brief in support of Texas v. Pennsylvania, a lawsuit filed at the United States Supreme Court contesting the results of the 2020 presidential election, in which Joe Biden defeated[30] Trump. The Supreme Court declined to hear the case on the basis that Texas lacked standing under Article III of the Constitution to challenge the results of an election held by another state.[31][32][33]

On January 7, 2021, Hagedorn objected to the certification of the 2020 presidential election results in Congress based on unproven claims of voter fraud.[34]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Electoral history

Republican primary results[36]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Jim Hagedorn 12,748 54.0
RepublicanAaron Miller10,87046.0
Total votes23,618 100.0
Minnesota’s 1st congressional district, 2014[37]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic (DFL) Tim Walz (incumbent) 122,851 54.2
RepublicanJim Hagedorn103,53645.7
N/AWrite-ins3080.1
Total votes226,695 100.0
Democratic (DFL) hold
Republican primary results[38]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Jim Hagedorn 10,851 76.5
RepublicanSteve Williams3,33023.5
Total votes14,181 100.0
Minnesota’s 1st congressional district, 2016 [39]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic (DFL) Tim Walz (incumbent) 169,074 50.3
RepublicanJim Hagedorn166,52649.6
N/AWrite-ins27701
Total votes335,877 100.0
Democratic (DFL) hold
Republican primary results
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Jim Hagedorn 25,418 60.1
RepublicanCarla Nelson13,58932.2
RepublicanSteve Williams2,1455.1
RepublicanAndrew Candler1,1062.6
Total votes42,258 100.0
Minnesota’s 1st congressional district, 2018
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Jim Hagedorn 146,199 50.1
Democratic (DFL)Dan Feehan144,88449.7
N/AWrite-ins5750.2
Total votes291,658 100.0
Republican gain from Democratic (DFL)

Personal life

Hagedorn is married to Jennifer Carnahan, the former chair of the Republican Party of Minnesota. They reside in Blue Earth, Minnesota.[7] He was diagnosed with stage 4 kidney cancer in 2019.[40] Hagedorn received immunotherapy to treat the cancer. In December 2020, he underwent surgery to remove the diseased kidney.[41]

Hagedorn pleaded guilty to a DUI charge in Fairfax County, Virginia, in 1983.[42]

References

  1. ^ a b Rao, Maya (November 7, 2018). “GOP’s Jim Hagedorn wins Minnesota’s First District seat on fourth try”. StarTribune.com. Retrieved November 7, 2018.
  2. ^ “Candidate Conversation – Jim Hagedorn (R) | News & Analysis”. Inside Elections. June 2, 2017. Retrieved April 21, 2020.
  3. ^ Holt, Marjorie (1976). The Case against the reckless Congress – Marjorie Holt – Google Books. ISBN 9780916054083. Retrieved November 7, 2018.
  4. ^ “Jim Hagedorn | Greater Mankato Growth”. Greatermankato.com. Retrieved November 7, 2018.
  5. ^ Mewes, Trey (August 10, 2018). “GOP voters to decide between Hagedorn and Nelson | Elections”. mankatofreepress.com. Retrieved November 7, 2018.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g “Biography – Jim Hagedorn (1962)”. Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved May 20, 2020.
  7. ^ a b “Jim Hagedorn’s Biography”. Vote Smart. Retrieved May 20, 2020.
  8. ^ Karnowski, Steve (October 12, 2018). “MN 1st District candidates Jim Hagedorn, Dan Feehan debate”. Twincities.com. Retrieved November 7, 2018.
  9. ^ Tim Murphy (April 22, 2014). “House candidate called female senators “undeserving bimbos in tennis shoes. Mother Jones. Retrieved July 24, 2020.
  10. ^ Lopez, Ricardo (August 23, 2014). “GOP U.S. House hopeful Jim Hagedorn defends old blog posts now under fire”. Star Tribune. Retrieved August 5, 2020.
  11. ^ Philip Wegmann (April 10, 2018). “Jim Hagedorn: The worst Republican candidate in America?”. Washington Examiner. Retrieved July 24, 2020.
  12. ^ Jones, Hannah (August 21, 2018). “U.S. House control could hinge on Minnesota’s Jim Hagedorn, ‘worst Republican candidate in America’ | City Pages”. City Pages. Retrieved July 24, 2020.
  13. ^ Pathé, Simone (August 14, 2018). “Hagedorn Wins GOP Nomination for Toss-Up Minnesota Race”. Roll Call. Retrieved August 23, 2019.
  14. ^ Syed, Moiz; Willis, Derek (October 15, 2009). “Two GOP candidates with familiar names consider run against Walz”. Post Bulletin. Archived from the original on November 2, 2012. Retrieved July 24, 2020.
  15. ^ Chuck Hunt (September 15, 2013). “Back for another campaign”. Faribault County Register. Retrieved July 24, 2020. The Blue Earth native and sometimes resident is back to try again to become the Republican candidate to run against U.S. Congressman Tim Walz a year from now in the November 2014 election.
  16. ^ Simone Pathé (August 10, 2018). “In Minnesota’s 1st District, a Test Between New and Old GOP Candidates – Roll Call”. Roll Call. Retrieved July 24, 2020.
  17. ^ Lachlan Markay; Jackie Kucinich (September 12, 2018). “GOP Chief Shocked to Discover His Candidate’s Crazy Remarks”. The Daily Beast. Retrieved July 24, 2020.
  18. ^ “The Lugar Center – McCourt School Bipartisan Index House Scores 116th Congress First Session (2019)” (PDF). Georgetown University. Retrieved May 20, 2020.
  19. ^ “Tracking Congress In The Age Of Trump – Jim Hagedorn”. ABC News. January 30, 2017. Retrieved May 20, 2020.
  20. ^ “Tracking Congress In The Age Of Trump”. ABC News. January 30, 2017. Retrieved May 20, 2020.
  21. ^ Michael Brice-Saddler (June 24, 2020). “GOP lawmakers launch new attacks on Black Lives Matter protesters”. Washington Post. Retrieved July 24, 2020.
  22. ^ Stolle, Matthew (July 26, 2020). “Hagedorn gets corporate blowback from BLM comments”. Twin Cities Pioneer Press. Retrieved August 5, 2020.
  23. ^ “Intel Calls For Minnesota Rep. Hagedorn To Return Campaign Donation Following Black Lives Matter Criticsm [sic]”. WCCO. July 23, 2020. Retrieved August 5, 2020.
  24. ^ “Rep. Hagedorn spent 40 percent of his 2020 budget in just 3 months – Caught Our Eye”. www.legistorm.com. Retrieved September 25, 2020.
  25. ^ a b Schneider, Gabe (August 25, 2020). “The other mail scandal: Rep. Jim Hagedorn’s office spending problems, explained”. MinnPost. Retrieved June 1, 2021.
  26. ^ “U.S. Rep. Jim Hagedorn says internal review resolved spending questions; DFL says not so fast”. Twin Cities Pioneer Press. September 9, 2020. Retrieved June 1, 2021.
  27. ^ Condon, Patrick; Bierschbach, Briana (August 26, 2020). “E-mails show U.S. Rep. Jim Hagedorn involved with constituent mail decisions”. Star Tribune. Retrieved September 23, 2020.
  28. ^ Newhauser, Daniel (October 9, 2020). “The mystery of a GOP congressman’s seemingly rent-free campaign office”. Politico. Retrieved October 9, 2020.
  29. ^ Andrego, Lauren (October 12, 2020). “Hagedorn denies report his campaign used rent-free office”. KEYC NBC. Retrieved June 1, 2021.
  30. ^ Blood, Michael R.; Riccardi, Nicholas (December 5, 2020). “Biden officially secures enough electors to become president”. AP News. Archived from the original on December 8, 2020. Retrieved December 12, 2020.
  31. ^ Liptak, Adam (December 11, 2020). “Supreme Court Rejects Texas Suit Seeking to Subvert Election”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on December 11, 2020. Retrieved December 12, 2020.
  32. ^ “Order in Pending Case” (PDF). Supreme Court of the United States. December 11, 2020. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 11, 2020. Retrieved December 11, 2020.
  33. ^ Diaz, Daniella. “Brief from 126 Republicans supporting Texas lawsuit in Supreme Court”. CNN. Archived from the original on December 12, 2020. Retrieved December 11, 2020.
  34. ^ Yourish, Karen; Buchanan, Larry; Lu, Denise (January 7, 2021). “The 147 Republicans Who Voted to Overturn Election Results”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  35. ^ “Membership”. Republican Study Committee. December 6, 2017. Retrieved March 28, 2021.
  36. ^ “Results for U.S. Representative District 1, 2014”. Minnesota Secretary of State. Retrieved November 3, 2019.
  37. ^ “Results for All Congressional Districts, 2014”. Minnesota Secretary of State. Retrieved January 8, 2015.
  38. ^ “August 9, 2016 Primary Election Unofficial Results”. Minnesota Secretary of State. August 9, 2016. Retrieved November 20, 2016.
  39. ^ “November 8, 2016 General Election Unofficial Results”. Minnesota Secretary of State. November 8, 2016. Retrieved November 20, 2016.
  40. ^ Marquette, Chris (February 20, 2019). “Rep. Jim Hagedorn announces he has kidney cancer”. Roll Call. Retrieved April 21, 2020.
  41. ^ Stolle, Matthew (December 28, 2020). “Doctors encouraged by Hagedorn’s progress, congressman says”. Post-Bulletin. Retrieved December 29, 2020.
  42. ^ Josh Moniz (August 26, 2014). “Hagedorn issues apology for statements”. Mankato Free Press. Retrieved July 24, 2020.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Minnesota’s 1st congressional district

2019–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States representatives by seniority
320th
Succeeded by


Issues

Source: Government page

Committees

Congressman Hagedorn is pleased to serve on the Committee on Agriculture and the Committee on Small Business. These assignments allow me to promote farming, Main Street enterprises and southern Minnesota’s way of life.

Visit the Committee websites:

Committee on Agriculture

Committee on Small Business

Congressman Hagedorn’s Subcommittee Assignments:

Legislation

Learn more about legislation sponsored and co-sponsored by Representative Hagedorn.

Issues

X
Tom EmmerTom Emmer – MN6

Current Position: US Representative for MN District 7 since 2015
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): State Delegate from 2005 – 2011

Featured Quote: 
Police reform must focus on efforts that improve relationships between law enforcement and the communities they serve. @StCloudPDMN is doing just that & my Community OutPost Outreach and Engagement Act will take their effort nationwide.

Featured Video: 
VIRAL MOMENT: House GOP member video gets stuck upside down during committee hearing

Reps. McHenry, Emmer urge CBO to review Democrats’ spending proposals
Financial Regulation News, DAVE KOVALESKIAugust 24, 2021 (Short)

Republican leaders within the House Financial Services Committee are requesting a report by the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) on the economic impact of new spending proposals put forward by Democrats.

Specifically, the congressmen, U.S. Rep. Patrick McHenry (R-NC), top Republican on the House Financial Services Committee, and U.S. Rep. Tom Emmer (R-MN), the ranking Republican on the Oversight and Investigations Subcommitee, are urging the CBO to analyze the effects of the proposed spending plan on GDP growth and consumer prices.

“Last September, the Congressional Budget Office issued a report entitled ‘The Effects of Pandemic-Related Legislation on Output.’ The reported analyzed the economic impact of the four spending bills Congress passed between March and April 2020, including the effect on gross domestic product (GDP), inflation, the debt and deficits. Since then, Congress has spent an additional $900 billion in December 2020 and $2 trillion in March 2021 in response to the global pandemic. Moreover, Democrats are on the cusp of spending an additional five trillion, some of which will be paid for through higher taxes, but mostly financed through additional debt,” the congressmen wrote to CBO Director Phillip Swagel

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for MN District 7 since 2015
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): State Delegate from 2005 – 2011

Featured Quote: 
Police reform must focus on efforts that improve relationships between law enforcement and the communities they serve. @StCloudPDMN is doing just that & my Community OutPost Outreach and Engagement Act will take their effort nationwide.

Featured Video: 
VIRAL MOMENT: House GOP member video gets stuck upside down during committee hearing

News

Reps. McHenry, Emmer urge CBO to review Democrats’ spending proposals
Financial Regulation News, DAVE KOVALESKIAugust 24, 2021 (Short)

Republican leaders within the House Financial Services Committee are requesting a report by the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) on the economic impact of new spending proposals put forward by Democrats.

Specifically, the congressmen, U.S. Rep. Patrick McHenry (R-NC), top Republican on the House Financial Services Committee, and U.S. Rep. Tom Emmer (R-MN), the ranking Republican on the Oversight and Investigations Subcommitee, are urging the CBO to analyze the effects of the proposed spending plan on GDP growth and consumer prices.

“Last September, the Congressional Budget Office issued a report entitled ‘The Effects of Pandemic-Related Legislation on Output.’ The reported analyzed the economic impact of the four spending bills Congress passed between March and April 2020, including the effect on gross domestic product (GDP), inflation, the debt and deficits. Since then, Congress has spent an additional $900 billion in December 2020 and $2 trillion in March 2021 in response to the global pandemic. Moreover, Democrats are on the cusp of spending an additional five trillion, some of which will be paid for through higher taxes, but mostly financed through additional debt,” the congressmen wrote to CBO Director Phillip Swagel

Twitter

About

Tom Emmer 1

Source: Government page

Congressman Tom Emmer was sworn in for his first term in the U.S. House of Representatives on January 6, 2015. He is currently serving his fourth term.

Tom was elected by his fellow Republican colleagues to join the House GOP Leadership team as the Chairman of the National Republican Congressional Committee for the 116th Congress and again for the 117th Congress. Currently, he sits on the House Financial Services Committee. He is also a member of the Republican Deputy Whip Team and the House Republican Steering Committee.

Born in 1961, Tom grew up in Minnesota and attended St. Thomas Academy. He received his BA in Political Science from the University of Alaska-Fairbanks and his JD from William Mitchell College of Law.

After practicing law for several years, he opened his own law firm. The next 20 years were spent balancing family, business, coaching hockey, and serving on the city councils in Independence and Delano.

Before coming to Congress, he served in the Minnesota House of Representatives from 2004-2008.

He and his wife Jacquie have been married for over 30 years and have seven children. They reside in Delano.

Voting Record

Votes on Bills

Caucuses

Autism Caucus
Bi-Partisan Congressional Pro-Life Caucus
BioFuels Caucus
Border Security Caucus
Congressional Beef Caucus
Congressional Blockchain Caucus
Congressional Boating Caucus
Congressional Broadcasters Caucus
Congressional Career and Technical Education Caucus
Congressional Caucus for Effective Foreign Assistance
Congressional Caucus on Foster Youth
Congressional Coalition on Adoption
Congressional Cybersecurity Caucus
Congressional Diabetes Caucus
Congressional Financial Security Caucus
Congressional Fintech and Payments Caucus
Congressional Fire Services Caucus
Congressional Franchise Caucus
Congressional Hockey Caucus
Congressional Independent Colleges Caucus
Congressional Internet Caucus
Congressional Personalized Medicine Caucus, Co-Chair
Congressional STARBASE Caucus
Congressional Suburban Caucus
Congressional Youth Sports Caucus
Dairy Caucus
Digital Trade Caucus
General Aviation Caucus
House Civil Legal Aid Caucus, Vice Chairman
House Entrepreneurship Caucus
House Manufacturing Caucus
House Rural Education Caucus
House Small Brewers Caucus
House RV Caucus
Joint Strike Fighters (JSF) Caucus
Law Enforcement Caucus
Mental Health Caucus
National Guard Caucus
Northern Border Caucus
Pro-life Caucus
Rare Disease Caucus
Rural Broadband Caucus
Sportsmen’s Caucus
U.S.-Japan Congressional Caucus
USO Congressional Caucus
UXO/Demining Caucus
Western Caucus

Task Forces

Task Force on Financial Technology – Ranking Member
Bipartisan Taskforce to Combat the Heroin Epidemic
Task Force to Combat Identity Theft and Fraud

Working Groups

Congressional Cuba Working Group

Offices

WASHINGTON, D.C. OFFICE

315 Cannon House Office Building
Washington, DC 20515
Phone: (202) 225-2331
Fax: (202) 225-6475

OTSEGO, MN OFFICE

9201 Quaday Ave. NE
Suite 206
Otsego, MN 55330
Phone: (763) 241-6848
Fax: (763) 241-7955

Contact

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Wikipedia Entry

Thomas Earl Emmer Jr.[1] (born March 3, 1961) is an American attorney, lobbyist and politician who has been the U.S. Representative for Minnesota’s 6th congressional district since January 2015. The district includes most of the northern suburbs of the Twin Cities, as well as St. Cloud.

Emmer served as a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives from 2005 until 2011 and was the Republican nominee for governor in the 2010 election. In the November 2014 general election, he won the 6th congressional district seat being vacated by Michele Bachmann.

Early life, education

Emmer was born in South Bend, Indiana;[2] his family later moved to Edina, Minnesota. He attended St. Thomas Academy, an all-male, Catholic, military, college-preparatory high school in Mendota Heights, near Saint Paul.[3]

Emmer attended Boston College[4] and the University of Alaska Fairbanks,[1] graduating in 1984 with a Bachelor of Arts in political science. He played hockey for both schools. In 1988 Emmer received a Juris Doctor from William Mitchell College of Law in Saint Paul, Minnesota.[5]

Career

Emmer began his legal career representing cities and counties through the League of Minnesota Cities Insurance Trust and the League of Minnesota Counties Insurance Trust, handling lawsuits against police officers. He also represented volunteer firefighters and city and county inspectors, and handled a variety of land use issues. He was licensed to practice law in Minnesota, North Dakota, and Wisconsin.[6]

Emmer served on city councils in Independence, Minnesota, and then in Delano, Minnesota.[4]

Minnesota House of Representatives

In 2004 incumbent Republican State Representative Dick Borrell of Minnesota’s House District 19B decided to retire. District 19B includes portions of Wright and Hennepin Counties and the cities of Otsego, Albertville, St. Michael, Rockford, Delano, Montrose, and Waverly.[4] Emmer, the Republican candidate, defeated Democrat Lori M. Schmidt, an attorney, 60%–40%, in the November 2004 general election.[7]

In 2006 Emmer won reelection to a second term with 61% of the vote.[8] In 2008 he was reelected to a third term with 61% of the vote.[9] In 2010 he chose to run for governor of Minnesota rather than seek reelection.

During legislative sessions, Emmer regularly rode the bus to the Minnesota State Capitol.[1] Emmer served on the Finance Committee, the Health Care and Human Services Policy and Oversight Committee, and the State and Local Government Operations Reform, Technology and Elections Committee. He was also a member of the Finance Subcommittee for the Health Care and Human Services Finance Division, and of the Health Care and Human Services Policy and Oversight Subcommittee for the Licensing Division.[4]

2010 gubernatorial election

Candidate Tom Emmer wearing an “Emmer for Governor” shirt in 2010

Emmer officially announced his candidacy for governor of the State of Minnesota in July 2009.[10][11] In January 2010, Emmer came in second to Marty Seifert in a non-binding straw poll of Republican Party caucus participants.[citation needed] In April 2010, Emmer announced that his running mate would be Metropolitan Council member Annette Meeks. Emmer received the endorsements of former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin,[12] Governor Tim Pawlenty, and Lieutenant Governor Carol Molnau.[13] On April 30, 2010, the Republican Party of Minnesota officially endorsed Emmer as its candidate for governor at the state convention in Minneapolis. His main opponent, Marty Seifert, withdrew from the race and endorsed Emmer when it became apparent that Emmer was nearing the threshold for party endorsement. On August 10, 2010, Emmer won the Republican primary with 82% of the vote, a 75-point margin over Bob Carney.[14][15]

The race attracted national attention as the “first case in this election cycle of a company hit by national protests over a campaign donation”.[16] Minnesota-based Target Corporation donated $150,000 to Minnesota Forward, a new political action committee paying for advertising that supported Emmer’s gubernatorial election.[17] Emmer said he viewed Target’s donation as an exercise in free speech and wanted to keep his campaign focused on economic issues.[18] Best Buy also donated $100,000 to Minnesota Forward.[19]

Emmer trailed his Democratic opponent Mark Dayton by 9,000 votes in the initial general election results, a margin small enough to trigger an automatic recount. Most analysts felt it was unlikely that the Emmer campaign could overcome such a deficit in a recount.[20] After the recount made little difference in the results, Emmer conceded the election on December 8, 2010.[21]

Post-2010 election activities

Emmer was a registered lobbyist in Minnesota,[22] and co-hosted a morning talk radio program with Bob Davis on KTLK in Minneapolis.

In early 2011, he ran for an open Minnesota seat on the Republican National Committee, but lost that election to Hennepin County Commissioner Jeff Johnson.[23]

Emmer hosted a 2011 event promoting the launch of Representative Ron Paul‘s presidential campaign in Minnesota.[24]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

2014

Upon the surprise retirement of U.S. Representative Michele Bachmann, Emmer was considered a possible candidate for the Sixth Congressional District seat; his state house district included a large slice of the congressional district’s western portion.[25] On June 5, 2013, Emmer officially announced he would seek the Republican nomination for the seat.[26] On February 4, 2014, Emmer received 67.9% of the vote in a 6th district straw poll.[27][28] On April 12 he received the Republican Party endorsement for the nomination on the first ballot with 76%, but he still faced a primary challenge from his two competitors, Anoka County Board Chairwoman Rhonda Sivarajah and former state representative Phil Krinkie.[29] Emmer was endorsed by the Tea Party Express, Young Americans for Liberty‘s Liberty Action Fund, and many Minnesota legislators.[30][31] He won the primary with 73% of the vote, and easily prevailed in the November general election.

2014 Republican primary results
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Tom Emmer 19,557 73.3
RepublicanRhonda Sivarajah7,12526.7
Total votes26,682 100.0
Minnesota’s 6th congressional district, 2014
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Tom Emmer 133,328 56.3
Democratic (DFL)Joe Perske90,92638.4
IndependenceJohn Denney12,4575.2
Write-in1350.1
Total votes236,846 100.0
Republican hold

2016

In 2016 Emmer defeated Democratic nominee David Snyder, 66% to 34%.

2016 Republican primary results
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Tom Emmer (incumbent) 13,590 68.7
RepublicanA. J. Kern5,21926.4
RepublicanPatrick Munro9624.9
Total votes19,771 100.0
Minnesota’s 6th congressional district election, 2016 [32]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Tom Emmer (incumbent) 235,380 65.6
Democratic (DFL)David Snyder123,00834.3
Write-in5360.1
Total votes358,924 100.0
Republican hold

2018

In 2018 Emmer defeated Democratic nominee Ian Todd, 61% to 39%.

2018 Republican primary results
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Tom Emmer (incumbent) 34,251 76.6
RepublicanA.J. Kern7,89717.7
RepublicanPatrick Munro2,5755.8
Total votes44,723 100.0
Minnesota’s 6th congressional district, 2018
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Tom Emmer (incumbent) 192,936 61.1
Democratic (DFL)Ian Todd122,33038.7
Write-in4630.2
Total votes315,729 100.0
Republican hold

2020

In 2020 Emmer defeated Democratic nominee Tawnja Zahradka 66% to 34%.

2020 Republican primary results
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Tom Emmer (incumbent) 30,654 87.2
RepublicanPatrick Munro4,51812.8
Total votes35,172 100.0
Minnesota’s 6th congressional district, 2020
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Tom Emmer (incumbent) 270,901 65.7
Democratic (DFL)Tawnja Zahradka140,85334.2
Write-in5530.1
Total votes412,307 100.0
Republican hold

Tenure

According to the McCourt School of Public Policy at Georgetown University, Emmer held a Bipartisan Index Score of -0.0 in the 116th United States Congress for 2019, which placed him 192nd out of 435 members.[33] Based on FiveThirtyEight‘s congressional vote tracker at ABC News, Emmer voted with Donald Trump’s stated public policy positions 91.5% of the time,[34] which ranked him average in the 116th United States Congress when predictive scoring (district partisanship and voting record) is used.[35]

In October 2020, after it was determined that Emmer had interacted with individuals who tested positive for coronavirus in Washington D.C., such as Donald Trump, Emmer flew on a Delta flight in violation of Delta’s rules, potentially exposing the other passengers to the virus.[36]

On May 19, 2021, Emmer and the other seven Republican House leaders voted against establishing a national commission to investigate the January 6, 2021 attack on the United States Capitol Complex. Thirty-five House Republicans and all 217 Democrats present voted to establish such a commission.[37][38]

In August 2021, Emmer released a statement about the resignation of Minnesota Republican Party chair Jennifer Carnahan after her ties with donor, strategist, and alleged sex trafficker became a national news story.[39] Emmer had previously received a $15,600 donation from Lazzaro, which Emmer said he would donate to charity.[40][41][42]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Political positions

Abortion

Emmer opposes abortion.[45]

BPA

In 2009, Emmer voted against legislation to prohibit sales of any children’s product containing Bisphenol-A (except for used children’s products).[46][47] He said he voted against the law because of fear of “increased costs.” As well-intentioned as people may be, he said, “they don’t think about what this vote means five steps down the line”.[48]

Bullying

During an October 9, 2010, televised debate, Emmer said he would oppose legislation to combat school bullying against gay and lesbian young people. Emmer, who voted against anti-bullying legislation as a state lawmaker, said that teachers are most responsible for halting bullies, but suggested that the threat of lawsuits keeps them from doing so. “I don’t think we need more laws; I think we need more understanding,” he said.[49]

Copper nickel mining in northern Minnesota

Emmer supports two copper nickel mines in the Superior National Forest[50] planned by Polymet, which is owned by Switzerland-based mining giant Glencore, and Twin Metals, which is owned by Antofagasta, a Chilean mining company controlled by the Luksics, one of Chile’s wealthiest families.[51]

When the Department of Interior did not list copper or nickel as two of 35 “critical minerals” essential to national security, Emmer released a press release of a letter he wrote to Department of Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke requesting that copper and nickel be included.[52]

Emmer and Representative Pete Stauber both stood beside Assistant Secretary of the Interior Joseph Balash as he signed leases permitting Twin Metals to explore a large area of national forest land nine miles southeast of Ely for copper-nickel reserves on May 15, 2019. The Obama administration had mothballed the lease renewal pending an environmental review, but Twin Metals is now in possession of a 10-year lease to explore the area, with a view toward opening a mine there.[53]

Drunk driving

In 2009, Emmer sponsored a bill that would shorten the period of license revocation for driving under the influence and for refusing to take a . Additionally, though “suspected drunken drivers [currently] face revocation before they go to court,” Emmer’s bill would have delayed revocations until after conviction.[54] Supporters of Emmer’s bill said “it’s needed because pre-conviction revocations penalize drivers before proving they’re guilty.”[55] Mothers Against Drunk Driving and the head of the Minnesota DWI task force opposed the legislation[56] because it would allow arrested drivers to continue to drive during the time between their arrest and hearing.[57]

Emmer’s own history became an issue in relation to his bill.[58] At age 20, Emmer received a driving under the influence-related ticket. In 1991 he pleaded guilty to careless driving while two charges for DWI and a license-plate violation were dropped.[59] Emmer denied that his own drunk driving and legal consequences played a part in the bill, stating, “We all come to the Legislature with life experiences, but it has nothing to do with this bill.”[54] Emmer also said that his sentence in 1981 should have been harsher, because in that case he “probably wouldn’t have taken the second chance” that led to his subsequent arrests and guilty plea in 1991.[60]

On May 13, 2010, Emmer was one of three legislators not to vote on a bill that would have provided such tougher penalties for drunk drivers. He said he missed the vote when a previously scheduled lunch ran long, and that he had “no idea” how he would have voted on the bill, but that he “assume[d]” he would have supported it.[61]

Healthcare

Emmer favors repealing the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare). After supporting the March 2017 version of the American Health Care Act (a bill to repeal the ACA), he voted for it on May 4, 2017, before it had been scored by the Congressional Budget Office to determine its economic impact.

Minimum wage

In 2005, as a state representative, Emmer introduced an amendment that would have eliminated Minnesota’s minimum wage law.[62]

National security

Emmer supported President Donald Trump‘s 2017 executive order to temporarily curtail immigration from seven predominantly Muslim countries until better screening methods are devised, saying, “Everybody needs to take a deep breath. There is no litmus test based on religion. The administration and I understand it has — takes the seven countries identified by the Obama administration, not this administration, as the most dangerous countries when it comes to potential terrorists.”[63]

Pharmacy conscience clause

Emmer has supported “conscience clause” legislation that would allow pharmacists to refuse to dispense contraception on the basis of “ethical, moral or legal grounds as long as the pharmacist notifies their employer in advance and the employer can ensure a patient has timely access to the drug or device”.[64]

Same-sex marriage

Emmer supported a state constitutional amendment banning civil recognition of same-sex marriage or its legal equivalent, stating, “I believe marriage is the union between one man and one woman.”[65] In March 2007, Emmer introduced HF 1847, a proposed amendment to the Minnesota Constitution “recognizing as marriage or its legal equivalent only a union between one man and one woman.”[66] Voters later rejected this proposal.

Allegations of antisemitism

In 2019, Emmer sent a fundraising letter that critics alleged included antisemitic tropes.[67] The letter claimed that “left-wing radicals essentially BOUGHT control of Congress for the Democrats” and that three Jewish billionaires (Michael Bloomberg, Tom Steyer and George Soros) “bought” control of Congress for Democrats.[68]

Emmer vigorously rejected the allegations, and numerous Republicans pushed back against them, including Matt Brooks of the Republican Jewish Coalition, who argued, “Firstly, Tom Steyer isn’t even Jewish; he’s a practicing Episcopalian. Secondly, people can’t simply be shielded from criticism because they’re Jewish, not when otherwise similar people are criticized for the same exact actions. If it’s fair to criticize the Kochs, like leading Democrat presidential candidates have done, then its fair to criticize the top Democratic funders.”[68]

State sovereignty

In 2010 Emmer sponsored an amendment to the Minnesota Constitution that would allow the state to nullify federal laws.[69]

Taxes

Emmer strongly opposes tax increases. He has also proposed gradually reducing the state corporate tax, with the eventual goal of repealing it altogether.[70]

Texas v. Pennsylvania

In December 2020, Emmer was one of 126 Republican members of the House of Representatives to sign an amicus brief in support of Texas v. Pennsylvania, a lawsuit filed at the United States Supreme Court contesting the results of the 2020 presidential election, in which Joe Biden defeated[71] incumbent Donald Trump. The Supreme Court declined to hear the case on the basis that Texas lacked standing under Article III of the Constitution to challenge the results of an election held by another state.[72][73][74]

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi issued a statement that called signing the amicus brief an act of “election subversion.” She also reprimanded Emmer and the other House members who supported the lawsuit: “The 126 Republican Members that signed onto this lawsuit brought dishonor to the House. Instead of upholding their oath to support and defend the Constitution, they chose to subvert the Constitution and undermine public trust in our sacred democratic institutions.”[75][76]

“Tip credit”

On July 5, 2010, after visiting a restaurant in St. Paul, Emmer was asked during a press conference if he supported a tip credit, the policy of allowing businesses to subtract tips from a server’s hourly wage. His response was “Yes… if you didn’t have a minimum wage law”, adding, “somebody could be taking home well over one hundred thousand dollars as a server” while the restaurant owner could be making much less.[77][78]

One week after that press conference, Emmer announced a proposal that would exempt the first $20,000 a server makes in tips from state taxes.[79] At the same press conference a protester dumped $20 in pennies in Emmer’s lap.[80]

Personal life

In 1910 Emmer’s great-grandfather and his two brothers founded Emmer Brothers Lumber.[81] It is now called Viking Forest Products and is employee-owned.[82]

Emmer has seven children with his wife, Jacqueline, whom he married in 1986.[6] He is an avid hockey player and coach.[1]

Electoral history

References

  1. ^ a b c d Helgeson, Baird. “Tom Emmer: Riding a new populist wave” Archived July 17, 2010, at the Wayback Machine, Star Tribune, July 11, 2010.
  2. ^ “Biography”. Congressman Tom Emmer. December 11, 2012. Retrieved January 11, 2018.
  3. ^ Biography Archived March 10, 2010, at the Wayback Machine at Emmer’s gubernatorial campaign website
  4. ^ a b c d Profile of Tom Emmer at Minnesota’s legislature’s website
  5. ^ “Emmer for Governor”. Tomemmer.com. Retrieved August 2, 2010.[permanent dead link]
  6. ^ a b Gueningsman, Ryan (July 13, 2009). “Governor Tom Emmer? Local lawmaker, attorney throws his hat into the ring”. Herald Journal. Retrieved July 23, 2019.
  7. ^ “Our Campaigns – MN House Seat 19B Race – Nov 02, 2004”. www.ourcampaigns.com. Retrieved June 7, 2018.
  8. ^ “Our Campaigns – MN House Seat 19B Race – Nov 07, 2006”. www.ourcampaigns.com. Retrieved June 7, 2018.
  9. ^ “Ourcampaigns.com”. Ourcampaigns.com. Retrieved August 23, 2014.
  10. ^ Duchschere, Kevin.
    “Delano’s Emmer plans run for governor”, Star Tribune, July 6, 2009.
  11. ^ “Emmer’s gubernatorial campaign website”. Emmerforgovernor.com. September 13, 2013. Retrieved August 23, 2014.
  12. ^ Sarah Palin Backs Emmer, Minnesota Public Radio News, April 29, 2010.
  13. ^ “Molnau backs Tom Emmer in gov’s race | Minnesota Public Radio NewsQ”. Minnesota.publicradio.org. January 25, 2010. Retrieved August 2, 2010.
  14. ^ “2010 Elections – Governor”. Star-Tribune.com. August 11, 2010. Archived from the original on July 16, 2010. Retrieved August 11, 2010.
  15. ^ Ourcampaigns.com
  16. ^ Hamburger, Tom (August 17, 2010). “Gay rights group’s talks with Target break down”. Los Angeles Times. Retrieved August 17, 2010.
  17. ^ Stassen-Berger, Rachel E. (July 18, 2010). “New Ads and a New Nod in Minnesota’s Governor Race”. Star Tribune. Retrieved August 3, 2010.
  18. ^ Logn, Martiga. “The Associated Press: Liberal groups push to exploit Target backlash”. Retrieved August 17, 2010.
  19. ^ Cummings, Jeanne (August 17, 2010). “MoveOn calls for boycott of Target”. Politico.
  20. ^ “Prelude to a recount”. Politics in Minnesota. November 3, 2010. Retrieved November 3, 2010.
  21. ^ Stassen-Berger, Rachel E. (December 8, 2010). “Emmer concedes; says Dayton is next governor”. Star Tribune. Archived from the original on September 11, 2012. Retrieved December 8, 2010.
  22. ^ Helgeson, Baird (February 14, 2011). “Emmer to lobby for effort he opposed as legislator”. Star Tribune. Retrieved August 23, 2014.
  23. ^ “Johnson defeats Emmer for RNC Seat”.
  24. ^ “Ron Paul will launch his Minnesota campaign in St. Cloud”. Archived from the original on October 18, 2011.
  25. ^ “Large field of Republicans will vie for Bachmann’s seat”. KARE 11. May 29, 2013. Archived from the original on June 15, 2013. Retrieved August 23, 2014.
  26. ^ Linkins, Jason (June 5, 2013). “Republican To Join Race To Replace Bachmann”. Huffington Post.
  27. ^ “CD6 Republicans – CD6 Republicans”.
  28. ^ “Emmer wins endorsement in 6th District”. KARE 11. April 12, 2014. Retrieved August 23, 2014.
  29. ^ Beldend, Doug (April 13, 2014). “GOP endorses Emmer for Bachmann’s 6th District seat”. Pioneer Press. Retrieved August 23, 2014.
  30. ^ “Tom Emmer”. LibertyAction. February 4, 2014. Archived from the original on May 2, 2014. Retrieved August 23, 2014.
  31. ^ “Endorses Tom Emmer for U.S. Congress in Minnesota’s 6th Congressional District”. Tea Party Express. April 28, 2014. Retrieved August 23, 2014.
  32. ^ “November 8, 2016 General Election Unofficial Results”. Minnesota Secretary of State. November 8, 2016. Retrieved November 20, 2016.
  33. ^ “The Lugar Center – McCourt School Bipartisan Index House Scores 116th Congress First Session (2019)” (PDF). Georgetown University. Retrieved May 20, 2020.
  34. ^ “Tracking Congress In The Age Of Trump – Tom Emmer”. ABC News. January 30, 2017. Retrieved May 20, 2020.
  35. ^ “Tracking Congress In The Age Of Trump”. ABC News. January 30, 2017. Retrieved May 20, 2020.
  36. ^ “Minnesota Republicans fly Delta home from D.C. after COVID-19 exposure”. Star Tribune. Retrieved October 3, 2020.
  37. ^ Roll Call 154 Bill Number: H. R. 3233 117th Congress, 1st Session, United States House of Representatives, May 19, 2021. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  38. ^ How Republicans voted on a commission to investigate the Jan. 6 Capitol riot, Washington Post, May 19, 2021. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  39. ^ Kare 11 Staff. “Minnesota GOP Chairwoman Jennifer Carnahan resigns”. KARE 11.
  40. ^ Uren, Adam. “Gold, private jets and Ferraris: Arrested GOP strategist Anton Lazzaro’s high-flying lifestyle”. Bring Me the News.
  41. ^ Orrick, Dave. “Minnesota GOP lawmakers grapple with donor’s child sex trafficking charges, return contributions”. Pioneer Press.
  42. ^ “Grand jury indicts Minn. GOP operative on child sex trafficking charges”. MPR News.
  43. ^ “MEMBERS”. RMSP. Retrieved March 1, 2021.
  44. ^ “Member List”. Retrieved November 6, 2017.
  45. ^ Stassen-Berger, Rachel E. (May 3, 2010). “In voting records, Kelliher and Emmer mirror images”. Hot Dish Politics. Star Tribune.
  46. ^ “S.F. No. 247, 2nd Engrossment – 86th Legislative Session (2009-2010)”. Minnesota Senate. Retrieved August 23, 2014.
  47. ^ “Roll Call on S.F. NO. 247 CALENDAR FOR THE DAY Passage – Minnesota House of Representatives”. House.leg.state.mn.us. May 5, 2009. Retrieved July 7, 2014.
  48. ^ Austin, Paul (October 6, 2010). “Five Steps Down the Line”. StarTribune.com. Retrieved November 1, 2010.
  49. ^ Hoppin, Jason (October 9, 2010). “Minnesota governor hopefuls square off over bullying laws: Dayton, Horner support legislation; Emmer calls for teacher protections”. Pioneer Press.
  50. ^ Marohn, Kirsti (September 7, 2018). “Emmer, McCollum weigh in on opening forests near Boundary Waters to mining exploration”. MPR News.
  51. ^ Jennifer, Bjorhaus (August 7, 2019). “What You Need to Know About The Polymet and Twin Metals Mines”. Star Tribune.
  52. ^ “Emmer Statement on Department of Interior’s Final List of Critical Minerals”. May 21, 2018. Retrieved May 21, 2018.
  53. ^ Uren, Adam (May 15, 2019). “Trump Administration renews leases for mining project near Boundary Waters Two Minnesota congressmen were on hand for the signing”. Bring Me The News.
  54. ^ a b “Sponsor of DWI change has 2-ticket DWI record”. StarTribune.com. March 29, 2009. Retrieved August 13, 2010.
  55. ^ Doyle, Pat (March 27, 2009). “Plan puts brakes on penalties for DWI”. Star Tribune. Retrieved August 13, 2010.
  56. ^ Foti, Jim. “Sponsor of DWI change has 2-ticket DWI record”, Star Tribune, March 29, 2009.
  57. ^ Scheck, Tom. “Seifert keeps up pressure on Emmer on DWI issue”, Minnesota Public Radio News, April 26, 2010.
  58. ^ Helgeson, Baird (April 22, 2010). “Emmer DWI dustup, Day 2”. StarTribune.com. Retrieved August 13, 2010.
  59. ^ Foti, Jim (March 29, 2009). “Sponsor of DWI change has 2-ticket DWI record”. Star Tribune. Retrieved August 2, 2010.
  60. ^ Doyle, Pat (April 21, 2010). “Guv’s race: Underwear, dirty laundry”. Star Tribune. Retrieved August 13, 2010.
  61. ^ Doyle, Pat (May 13, 2010). “Emmer, MIA on DWI vote, ignites criticism”. Star Tribune. Retrieved August 13, 2010.
  62. ^ Bakst, Brian (July 14, 2010). “Minnesota GOP hopeful Emmer tries to fix tip jam”. BusinessWeek. Archived from the original on August 18, 2010. Retrieved August 13, 2010.
  63. ^ Blake, Aaron (January 29, 2017). “Coffman, Gardner join Republicans against President Trump’s travel ban; here’s where the rest stand”. Denver Post. Retrieved January 30, 2017.
  64. ^ “Pharmacists’ Conscience Clause” Goes To House Floor, Tom Emmer’s office press release, March 9, 2006.
  65. ^ Social Values page Archived July 23, 2010, at the Wayback Machine at Emmer’s campaign website
  66. ^ HF1847 Status in House for Legislative Session 85 Minnesota State Legislature.
  67. ^ “Left or right, pro-Israel positions don’t excuse anti-Semitism”. J. August 16, 2019. Retrieved July 27, 2020.
  68. ^ a b Sonmez, Felicia; DeBonis, Mike (August 7, 2019). “Head of House GOP campaign arm accused of anti-Semitism after letter claiming Bloomberg, Steyer and Soros ‘bought’ control of Congress”. The Washington Post. Retrieved July 27, 2020.
  69. ^ Kleefeld, Eric (June 22, 2010). “Emmer Defends Nullification: ‘Minnesotans Should Have A Say In The Laws That Govern Them. Talking Points Memo.
  70. ^ “Taxes – The Issues”. Emmer for Governor. Archived from the original on October 21, 2010. Retrieved August 17, 2010.
  71. ^ Blood, Michael R.; Riccardi, Nicholas (December 5, 2020). “Biden officially secures enough electors to become president”. AP News. Archived from the original on December 8, 2020. Retrieved December 12, 2020.
  72. ^ Liptak, Adam (December 11, 2020). “Supreme Court Rejects Texas Suit Seeking to Subvert Election”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on December 11, 2020. Retrieved December 12, 2020.
  73. ^ “Order in Pending Case” (PDF). Supreme Court of the United States. December 11, 2020. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 11, 2020. Retrieved December 11, 2020.
  74. ^ Diaz, Daniella. “Brief from 126 Republicans supporting Texas lawsuit in Supreme Court”. CNN. Archived from the original on December 12, 2020. Retrieved December 11, 2020.
  75. ^ Smith, David (December 12, 2020). “Supreme court rejects Trump-backed Texas lawsuit aiming to overturn election results”. The Guardian. Retrieved December 13, 2020.
  76. ^ “Pelosi Statement on Supreme Court Rejecting GOP Election Sabotage Lawsuit” (Press release). Speaker Nancy Pelosi. December 11, 2020. Retrieved December 13, 2020.
  77. ^ “GOP’s Emmer Would Like To Cut Waiter Wages”. YouTube. July 5, 2010. Retrieved August 8, 2010.
  78. ^ Crosby, Jackie (July 5, 2010). “Emmer: Lower wages for tipped workers. The gubernatorial candidate says wages for restaurant workers are taking money from customers”. Star Tribune.
  79. ^ Bakst, Brian; Mulcahy, Mike (July 13, 2010). “Emmer’s latest plan: Don’t tax tips”. Minnesota Public Radio. Associated Press.
  80. ^ Van Denburg, Hart (July 15, 2010). “Tom Emmer doused with 2,000 pennies by protester [VIDEO]”. City Pages. Village Voice Media. Archived from the original on March 23, 2012. Retrieved May 4, 2012.
  81. ^ “Tom Emmer – Biographies – About the Team”. Emmer for Governor. Archived from the original on September 26, 2010. Retrieved August 17, 2010.
  82. ^ About Us Archived May 2, 2010, at the Wayback Machine at Viking Forest’s official website

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Minnesota House of Representatives
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Dick Borrell
Member of the Minnesota House of Representatives
from District 19B

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2010
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Chair of the National Republican Congressional Committee
2019–present
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U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

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from Minnesota’s 6th congressional district

2015–present
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Michelle FischbachMichelle Fischbach – MN7

Current Position: US Representative for Minnesota's 7th Congressional District since 2021
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): Lt. Governor from 2018 – 2019; State Senator from 1996 – 2018

Featured Quote: 
A person’s wealth is irrelevant. Taxpayer funded abortion is wrong. Every innocent human life is precious and needs to be protected. #HydeSavesLives #MN07

Featured Video: 
Michelle Fischbach on the year of the GOP woman

Minnesota delegation divided on response in Afghanistan
Minnesota Star Tribune, Briana Bierschbach and Jessie Van Berkel August 24, 2021 (Long)

Members of Congress on both sides of the aisle have been pushing to expedite special immigrant visas for Afghans who partnered with the United States during the war, and to get visa applicants out of Afghanistan.

Freshman Republican Rep. Michelle Fischbach said the administration’s top priority must be getting American citizens out, keeping every option on the table until that’s accomplished.

“This is a mess created by President Biden and his administration,” said Fischbach, who represents Minnesota’s Seventh District. “There should have been a process already in place to make sure we were extracting American citizens and vetted, confirmed allies.”

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for Minnesota’s 7th Congressional District since 2021
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): Lt. Governor from 2018 – 2019; State Senator from 1996 – 2018

Featured Quote: 
A person’s wealth is irrelevant. Taxpayer funded abortion is wrong. Every innocent human life is precious and needs to be protected. #HydeSavesLives #MN07

Featured Video: 
Michelle Fischbach on the year of the GOP woman

News

Minnesota delegation divided on response in Afghanistan
Minnesota Star Tribune, Briana Bierschbach and Jessie Van Berkel August 24, 2021 (Long)

Members of Congress on both sides of the aisle have been pushing to expedite special immigrant visas for Afghans who partnered with the United States during the war, and to get visa applicants out of Afghanistan.

Freshman Republican Rep. Michelle Fischbach said the administration’s top priority must be getting American citizens out, keeping every option on the table until that’s accomplished.

“This is a mess created by President Biden and his administration,” said Fischbach, who represents Minnesota’s Seventh District. “There should have been a process already in place to make sure we were extracting American citizens and vetted, confirmed allies.”

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About

Michelle Fischbach 1

Source: Government page

Michelle Fischbach is a trailblazer and proven conservative leader with over 20 years of experience in the Minnesota Senate, including four as the President of the Senate.

In 1996, Michelle was first elected to the Minnesota Senate in a special election by flipping a long-held Democrat seat, a position she held until 2018.  In 2011, Michelle was the first woman in Minnesota history to serve as President of the Minnesota Senate. She also served as Chair of the Minnesota Senate Higher Education Committee, and most recently was the 49th Lieutenant Governor of Minnesota, ascending to that position following the resignation of her predecessor.

Michelle has spent the last two decades cultivating strong relationships with the agriculture community and will continue to fight for Minnesota’s farm families in Congress. Michelle knows that policies pushed by Nancy Pelosi’s Democrats, like the radical Green New Deal, will be incredibly harmful for the agricultural industry and raise energy costs for every American.

During her time in public service, Michelle has championed many important issues for Minnesota families, workers, and small businesses. She strongly believes in our Second Amendment rights and is a fierce defender of the unborn.

A native Minnesotan, Michelle received a B.A. in Political Science from St. Cloud State University and a J.D. from William Mitchell College of Law. She and her husband, Scott, have two adult children and six grandchildren, and live in the Paynesville area.

Voting Record

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Offices

MOORHEAD

2513 8th Street S

Moorhead, MN 56560

Phone: (218) 422-2090

WILLMAR

2211 1st Street S

Suite 190

Willmar, MN 56201

Phone: (320) 403-6100

WASHINGTON, D.C.

1237 Longworth House

Office Building

Washington, DC 20515

Phone: (202) 225-2165

 

 

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Wikipedia Entry

Michelle Louise Helene Fischbach (née St. Martin; born November 3, 1965) is an American attorney and politician who is the U.S. representative from Minnesota’s 7th congressional district. The district, Minnesota’s largest and most rural district, includes most of the western area of the state, including Moorhead, Fergus Falls, Bemidji, Detroit Lakes, Morris, Thief River Falls, Willmar, Marshall, and Alexandria. A Republican, Fischbach previously served as the 49th lieutenant governor of Minnesota and as the first female president of the Minnesota Senate.

Early life, education and career

Fischbach grew up in Woodbury, Minnesota. After graduating from Woodbury High School, she attended the College of St. Benedict in St. Joseph from 1984 to 1986; she later transferred to St. Cloud State University, where she graduated with a B.A. in political science and economics in 1989.[1] Fischbach earned her J.D. from William Mitchell School of Law in Saint Paul in 2011.[2]

In 1994, Fischbach became the first woman elected to the Paynesville City Council, where she served until she was elected to the Minnesota Senate in 1996.[3]

Minnesota Senate

Fischbach was elected to the Minnesota Senate in 1996 in a special election held after the resignation of DFL Senator Joe Bertram, who had recently pleaded guilty to shoplifting.[1] Fischbach was reelected months later in the 1996 general election, and in 2000, 2002, 2006, 2010, 2012, and 2016.[4] She served as an assistant minority leader from 2001 to 2002 and from 2007 to 2008, and as a deputy minority leader from 2009 to 2010.[5] Fischbach also served as the chair of the Senate’s higher education committee.[5]

In 2011, after an election in which Senate Republicans won a majority for the first time since party designation, Fischbach’s colleagues elected her the first female president of the Minnesota Senate, a post she held until Republicans lost their majority in 2013.[6] After Republicans regained a majority following the 2016 election, Fischbach was again elected Senate president on January 3, 2017.[7]

Lieutenant governor of Minnesota (2018–2019)

Succession

On December 13, 2017, Governor Mark Dayton appointed his lieutenant governor, Tina Smith, to the U.S. Senate seat of Al Franken, who resigned over allegations of sexual misconduct. Smith resigned to accept the appointment on January 2, 2018. Per Article V of the Minnesota Constitution, as president of the State Senate, Fischbach automatically ascended as lieutenant governor.[8] [b]

Constitutional dispute

Official portrait of Lt. Gov. Fischbach in 2018

Fischbach acknowledged that she was now lieutenant governor, but maintained she would retain her Senate seat, calling herself “acting lieutenant governor.”[10] The constitutionality of holding two offices at once was disputed.[11][12] Fischbach noted a memo from the Senate’s nonpartisan counsel, which cited an 1898 Minnesota Supreme Court decision as legal precedent for her to hold both offices.[13] She also said the lieutenant governor’s duties are largely ceremonial and she would have no difficulty holding both offices.[14] She declined the lieutenant governor’s salary, opting to receive only the pay of a state senator.[15] An advisory opinion from state attorney general Lori Swanson disputed the legality of Fischbach’s holding both offices at once, citing a 1972 constitutional amendment and other historical precedents.[16][17][c]

The potential outcomes were seen as having potentially significant ramifications on Minnesota politics, as Republicans held only a two-vote majority in the state Senate.[19] In December 2017, to avoid a potential tie should Fischbach resign her Senate seat, Senate Majority Leader Paul Gazelka and House Speaker Kurt Daudt sent Dayton a letter requesting a special legislative session to temporarily elect a Democratic president of the Senate.[19][20] Dayton and legislative Democrats immediately rejected the idea, with Senate Minority Leader Tom Bakk indicating he would file a lawsuit to attempt to force Fischbach out of the Senate should she attempt to serve in both offices, saying the senate’s “balance of power […] will be up for grabs.”[21][22]

In January 2018, a constituent and local DFL activist filed suit against Fischbach, asking a Ramsey County District Court judge to remove her from the state Senate.[23] In February 2018, a judge dismissed the suit, ruling it had been prematurely filed.[24]

On May 25, 2018, Fischbach resigned from the Senate and was sworn in as lieutenant governor.[25]

Campaign

In May 2018, former Republican Governor Tim Pawlenty announced Fischbach as his running mate in his bid for a third term.[26] Pawlenty and Fischbach were defeated in the Republican primary by Jeff Johnson and Donna Bergstrom.[27]

Fischbach was succeeded as lieutenant governor by Democrat Peggy Flanagan, running mate of Tim Walz, who was sworn in on January 7, 2019.[28]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

On September 3, 2019, Fischbach announced her candidacy for the Republican nomination to challenge 30-year incumbent Democrat Collin Peterson in Minnesota’s 7th congressional district.[29] She won the five-way Republican primary election.[30] Despite Peterson’s incumbency, the 7th had been trending Republican for some time. The Republican presidential nominee had carried the district by double-digit margins in three of the last five elections. This included 2016, when Donald Trump carried it with 62 percent of the vote, his best showing in Minnesota and one of Trump’s best performances in a district held by a Democrat.

During her campaign, Fischbach pledged to back Trump on trade, make the 2017 tax cuts permanent, and support workforce education and additional relief for rural and agricultural businesses affected by COVID-19.[31][32] Her campaign emphasized her support for farmers and the Second Amendment, opposition to abortion, and support for strengthening the U.S. border.[33][34]

Fischbach defeated Peterson by 49,226 votes, the largest margin of any Republican who defeated an incumbent Democrat in 2020.[35] In that same election, Trump carried the 7th with 64 percent of the vote, his best showing in the state.[36] She and Mariannette Miller-Meeks of Iowa are the only Republican members of Congress to flip Democratic House districts that were not held by Republicans before 2018.

Tenure

On January 7, 2021, Fishbach was one of 139 representatives to object to the certification of electoral votes from Arizona and Pennsylvania in the 2020 U.S. presidential election, citing allegations of irregularities and voter fraud.[37] On January 13, 2021, she voted against the second impeachment of Trump.[38]

Fischbach, along with all other Senate and House Republicans, voted against the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021.[39]

In September 2021, Fischbach was among 75 House Republicans to vote against the National Defense Authorization Act of 2022, which contains a provision that would require women to be drafted.[40][41]

Committee assignments

Caucus membership

Personal life

Fischbach is Roman Catholic.[5] She met her husband, Scott, while working on a campaign for former U.S. Senator Rudy Boschwitz. They started dating while she was attending St. Cloud State University and eventually moved to nearby Paynesville.[14] When Fischbach ran for Congress, she still lived in Paynesville, which is in the far southern section of the district. She and her family have since moved to Regal, near Willmar, firmly in the 7th district. They have two children and several grandchildren.[47][48]

Fischbach’s husband has served as executive director of Minnesota Citizens Concerned for Life since 2001.[49]

Electoral history

2020

Republican primary results
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Michelle Fischbach 26,359 58.8%
RepublicanDave Hughes9,94822.2%
RepublicanNoel Collis6,74715.1%
RepublicanWilliam Louwagie9892.2%
RepublicanJayesun Sherman7571.7%
Total votes44,800 100.0%
Minnesota’s 7th congressional district, 2020
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Michelle Fischbach 188,994 53.8%
Democratic (DFL)Collin Peterson (incumbent)139,07139.6%
Total votes351,227 100.0%
Republican gain from Democratic (DFL)

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Took oath of office on May 25, 2018.
  2. ^ The Minnesota Constitution provides “The last elected presiding officer of the senate shall become lieutenant governor in case a vacancy occurs in that office.”[9]
  3. ^ The Minnesota Constitution specifies “No senator or representative shall hold any other office under the authority of the United States or the state of Minnesota, except that of postmaster or of notary public.”[18]

References

  1. ^ a b Bierschbach, Briana (December 20, 2017). I never asked for it’: Meet the lawmaker in the middle of Minnesota’s lieutenant governor mess”. MinnPost. Retrieved December 22, 2017.
  2. ^ “Elected and Appointed Officials in Minnesota – Mitchell Hamline Alumni – Mitchell Hamline School of Law”. mitchellhamline.edu. Retrieved December 29, 2017.
  3. ^ Connors, Molly (November 12, 1996). “Fischbach beats Schurman, keeps Senate seat”. Paynesville Press. Retrieved January 1, 2021.
  4. ^ Sommerhauser, Mark (November 7, 2012). “Fischbach re-elected to 7th term in Senate 13”. St. Cloud Times. Archived from the original on December 4, 2012.
  5. ^ a b c “Fischbach, Michelle L”. Minnesota Legislative Reference Library. Minnesota Legislature.
  6. ^ Pugmire, Tim (November 22, 2010). “Abortion opponent promises to stick to job description in new gig as Senate president”. Minnesota Public Radio News. St. Paul, Minnesota. Republican Sen. Michelle Fischbach of Paynesville will be the first woman in state history to preside as president of the Senate.
  7. ^ Pugmire, Tim (November 10, 2016). “Gazelka picked as new GOP state Senate leader”. Minnesota Public Radio News. St. Paul, Minnesota. Senate Republicans also announced the selection of Sen. Michelle Fischbach, R-Paynesville, as Senate president.
  8. ^ Bakst, Brian; Pugmire, Tim (December 13, 2017). “Smith to take Franken’s Senate seat, run in 2018”. Minnesota Public Radio. Minnesota’s succession plan calls for the state Senate president to become Lieutenant Governor, so as Smith moves to the U.S. Senate, state Sen. Michelle Fischbach, R-Paynesville, will move into Smith’s position.
  9. ^ “Minnesota Constitution, Article V, § 5 (Succession to offices of governor and lieutenant governor.)”. Office of the Revisor of Statutes. Minnesota Legislature.
  10. ^ Orrick, Dave (January 3, 2018). “State Sen. Fischbach calling herself ‘acting’ lieutenant governor, declines salary”. St. Paul Pioneer Press. St. Paul, Minnesota. Fischbach hedged her new title, calling herself “acting lieutenant governor”—a phrase that does not appear anywhere in the Minnesota Constitution.
  11. ^ Pugmire, Tim (December 13, 2017). “Can she do that? New MN lieutenant gov. wants to keep Senate seat, too”. Minnesota Public Radio News. St. Paul, Minnesota.
  12. ^ “Unclear if Fischbach can keep Senate seat as Lt. Governor”. KMSP-TV. Eden Prairie, Minnesota. December 13, 2017.
  13. ^ Orrick, Dave (December 15, 2017). “8 fun facts about the 1898 Supreme Court case that could decide the balance of power in the Minnesota Senate”. St. Paul Pioneer Press. St. Paul, Minnesota.
  14. ^ a b Van Berkel, Jessie (January 2, 2018). “Republican Fischbach prepares for unusual partnership as Gov. Dayton’s lieutenant”. Star Tribune. Retrieved January 2, 2018.
  15. ^ Coolican, J. Patrick (January 4, 2018). “Lt. Gov. Michelle Fischbach will decline pay, continue in Minn. Senate; lawsuit likely”. Star Tribune. Retrieved January 3, 2018.
  16. ^ Bakst, Brian (December 21, 2017). “Can lieutenant gov. keep Senate seat? AG’s view sets stage for suit”. Minnesota Public Radio News. Retrieved December 22, 2017.
  17. ^ Orrick, Dave (December 21, 2017). “GOP Senate leader can’t be lieutenant governor, too, MN attorney general says”. St. Paul Pioneer Press. St. Paul, Minnesota.
  18. ^ “Minnesota Constitution Art. IV, § 5 (Restriction on holding office.)”. Office of the Revisor of Statutes. Minnesota Legislature.
  19. ^ a b Potter, Kyle (January 1, 2018). “As Smith heads to DC, questions linger over her replacement”. Minnesota Public Radio News. Retrieved January 2, 2018.
  20. ^ Raghavendran, Beena (December 22, 2017). “Minnesota GOP legislative leaders call for special session”. Star Tribune. Retrieved December 29, 2017.
  21. ^ Potter, Kyle (December 28, 2017). “Senate’s top Democrat rules out special session on lieutenant governor”. St. Paul Pioneer Press. St. Paul, Minnesota. Retrieved December 29, 2017.
  22. ^ Bierschbach, Briana (December 13, 2017). “The constitutional mess created by Tina Smith’s appointment”. MinnPost. Retrieved December 29, 2017.
  23. ^ Orrick, Dave (January 12, 2018). “Lawsuit asks judge to kick Lt. Gov. Michelle Fischbach out of her MN Senate seat”. St. Paul Pioneer Press. St. Paul, Minnesota. Retrieved January 13, 2018.
  24. ^ Van Berkel, Jessie (February 12, 2018). “Ramsey County judge dismisses lawsuit against Fischbach over senate seat, but fight likely not over”. Star Tribune. Retrieved February 13, 2018.
  25. ^ Golden, Erin; Coolican, J. Patrick (May 25, 2018). “Fischbach resigns from state senate, is sworn in as lieutenant governor”. Star Tribune. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  26. ^ Coolican, J. Patrick (May 31, 2018). “Tim Pawlenty picks Michelle Fischbach as running mate”. Star Tribune. Retrieved June 10, 2018.
  27. ^ Bierschbach, Briana; Bakst, Brian (August 14, 2018). “Walz and Johnson win Minnesota governor primary, will face off in November”. Minnesota Public Radio.
  28. ^ Frost, Evan; Staff, MPR News. “Photos: The Walz Administration takes oath of office”. www.mprnews.org. Retrieved March 4, 2019.
  29. ^ Pugmire, Tim (September 2, 2019). “Michelle Fischbach announces congressional challenge to Collin Peterson”. MPR News.
  30. ^ “Michelle Fischbach wins 7th District Republican primary”. FOX 9. August 11, 2020. Retrieved December 13, 2020.
  31. ^ Jones, Jeremy (September 23, 2020). “Michelle Fischbach talks economy, agriculture and more during campaign stop in Glencoe”. Crow River Media. Hutchinson Leader. Retrieved September 30, 2020.
  32. ^ Bakst, Brian (September 3, 2019). “Fischbach says she’ll back Trump on trade, other issues”. MPR News.
  33. ^ Hall, Madison (September 4, 2020). “Rep. Collin Peterson faces a tough reelection fight in Minnesota’s 7th Congressional District”. Business Insider. Retrieved September 30, 2020.
  34. ^ Orenstein, Walker (September 25, 2020). “National Democrats are going after GOP candidate Michelle Fischbach for something Minnesota Democrats have long championed”. MinnPost. Retrieved September 30, 2020.
  35. ^ “Republican Michelle Fischbach wins election to U.S. House in Minnesota’s 7th Congressional District, beating incumbent Rep. Collin Peterson”. AP NEWS. November 4, 2020. Retrieved December 13, 2020.
  36. ^ Presidential results by congressional district from Daily Kos
  37. ^ Yourish, Karen; Buchanan, Larry; Lu, Denise (January 7, 2021). “The 147 Republicans Who Voted to Overturn Election Results”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  38. ^ Condon, Patrick. “Minnesota delegation splits by party on vote to impeach Trump”. Star Tribune. Retrieved January 14, 2021.
  39. ^ Carl Hulse (March 6, 2021). “After Stimulus Victory in Senate, Reality Sinks in: Bipartisanship Is Dead”. New York Times.
  40. ^ Zilbermints, Regina (September 23, 2021). “House passes sweeping defense policy bill”. TheHill.
  41. ^ “H.R. 4350: National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2022 — House Vote #293 — Sep 23, 2021”. GovTrack.us.
  42. ^ “Thompson Announces Republican Agriculture Subcommittee Leadership for 117th Congress”. Committee On Agriculture Republicans. February 5, 2021. Retrieved February 7, 2021.
  43. ^ “Biotechnology, Horticulture, and Research | House Agriculture Committee”. agriculture.house.gov. Retrieved April 16, 2021.
  44. ^ a b c “Ranking Member Jordan Announces Republican Subcommittee Assignments for 117th Congress”. House Judiciary Committee Republicans. Retrieved February 21, 2021.
  45. ^ “Subcommittee on Expedited Procedures (117th Congress)”. House of Representatives Committee on Rules. Retrieved February 24, 2021.
  46. ^ “Membership”. Republican Study Committee. December 6, 2017. Retrieved March 28, 2021.
  47. ^ “Michelle Fischbach (Minnesota (MN)), 117th Congress Profile”. Office of the Clerk, U.S. House of Representatives. Retrieved April 16, 2021.
  48. ^ “Project Vote Smart – Senator Michelle L. Fischbach – Biography”. Votesmart.org. Retrieved September 14, 2011.
  49. ^ Jacobson, Michael (June 13, 2001). “Scott Fischbach to head MCCL”. Paynesville Press. Paynesville, Minnesota. Retrieved September 14, 2011.

External links

Minnesota Senate
Preceded by

Member of the Minnesota Senate
from the 14th district

1996–2013
Succeeded by

Preceded by

Member of the Minnesota Senate
from the 13th district

2013–2018
Succeeded by

Political offices
Preceded by

President of the Minnesota Senate
2011–2013
Succeeded by

Preceded by

President of the Minnesota Senate
2017–2018
Succeeded by

Preceded by

Lieutenant Governor of Minnesota
2018–2019
Succeeded by

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Minnesota’s 7th congressional district
2021-present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States representatives by seniority
386th
Succeeded by


Issues

Committees

  • House Committee on Agriculture
    • Subcommittee on Commodity Exchanges, Energy, and Credit (Ranking Member)
    • Subcommittee on Biotechnology, Horticulture, and Research
  • House Committee on the Judiciary
    • Subcommittee on Constitution, Civil Rights and Civil Liberties
    • Subcommittee on Courts, Intellectual Property and the Internet
    • Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law
  • House Committee on Rules
    • Subcommittee on Expedited Procedures (Ranking Member)

Legislation

Sponsored and Cosponsored

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X
Pete StauberPete Stauber – MN8

Current Position: US Representative for MN District 8 since 2019
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): Member of the St. Louis County Commission from 2013 – 2019

Featured Quote: 
Minnesotans deserve to feel safe. That’s why, as my Democrat colleagues push forward harmful policies to take away funds and resources from law enforcement, I will continue to act as a firewall and fight back against their efforts to defund the police.

Featured Video: 
Pete Stauber On Why The North Is Turning To The GOP

Omar, other ‘squad’ members appeal to Biden on pipeline
MPR News, Matt Sepic and Tim PugmireSeptember 3, 2021 (Short)

Earlier Friday Republican U.S. Rep. Pete Stauber held an event of his own with Republican legislators at the Minnesota Capitol to say the Line 3 pipeline is a valid project that benefits many construction workers and their families.

Rep. Pete Stauber speaks at the state Capitol.
Rep. Pete Stauber speaks about the Line 3 oil pipeline replacement project at the state Capitol in St. Paul on Friday.
Tim Pugmire | MPR News

Stauber said he would fight any effort to stop the pipeline as it nears completion.

“Enbridge replacement of Line 3 is a good, safe project,” Stauber said. “It’s been vetted — one of the most vetted projects in this entire state. And it has been successfully defended in the courts.”

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for MN District 8 since 2019
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): Member of the St. Louis County Commission from 2013 – 2019

Featured Quote: 
Minnesotans deserve to feel safe. That’s why, as my Democrat colleagues push forward harmful policies to take away funds and resources from law enforcement, I will continue to act as a firewall and fight back against their efforts to defund the police.

Featured Video: 
Pete Stauber On Why The North Is Turning To The GOP

News

Omar, other ‘squad’ members appeal to Biden on pipeline
MPR News, Matt Sepic and Tim PugmireSeptember 3, 2021 (Short)

Earlier Friday Republican U.S. Rep. Pete Stauber held an event of his own with Republican legislators at the Minnesota Capitol to say the Line 3 pipeline is a valid project that benefits many construction workers and their families.

Rep. Pete Stauber speaks at the state Capitol.
Rep. Pete Stauber speaks about the Line 3 oil pipeline replacement project at the state Capitol in St. Paul on Friday.
Tim Pugmire | MPR News

Stauber said he would fight any effort to stop the pipeline as it nears completion.

“Enbridge replacement of Line 3 is a good, safe project,” Stauber said. “It’s been vetted — one of the most vetted projects in this entire state. And it has been successfully defended in the courts.”

Twitter

About

Pete Stauber 1

Source: Government page

Congressman Pete Stauber is a Duluth native, currently serving his second term in Congress as the Representative from Minnesota’s Eighth Congressional District. Congressman Stauber believes that Northeastern Minnesota deserves strong, principled leadership in Washington, D.C. and is focused on unleashing the economic engine in the region.

Congressman Stauber currently serves on the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, Small Business Committee, and Natural Resources Committee. On the Natural Resources Committee, Congressman Stauber serves as the Ranking Member of the Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources, where he remains committed to maintaining American energy independence and ending reliance on foreign minerals.

Congressman Stauber has a remarkable record of public service. Prior to his time in Congress, Stauber worked as a St. Louis County Commissioner, City Councilor in Hermantown, and Duluth police officer for over two decades.

During his tenure as a police officer, Stauber was the victim of two violent gun crimes. In 1995, he was shot in the head while off-duty by a criminal with multiple past offenses. A few years later, a suspect pulled the trigger at point blank range, and by the grace of God, the gun malfunctioned. His experience as a police officer solidified his view that more must be done to support law enforcement and create safer communities, which is why he is leading policing legislation called the JUSTICE Act in the House.

Congressman Stauber graduated from Denfeld High School and received a scholarship to play hockey at Lake Superior State University. During his sophomore year, Stauber became team captain and led the Lakers to a Division 1 National Championship. Following college graduation, he went on to play hockey with the Detroit Red Wings Organization.

Congressman Stauber lives in Hermantown with his wife Jodi, an Iraq War veteran and the first female Command Chief of the 148th Fighter Wing. Together, they are the proud parents of four children: Levi, Luke, Isaac, and Addilynn. They are also proud foster parents.

Voting Record

Votes on Bills

Caucuses 

Law Enforcement Caucus
Steel Caucus
Western Caucus
Sportsmen’s Caucus
Problem Solvers Caucus

Offices

Washington, DC Office

461 Cannon HOB
WashingtonDC 20515

Phone: (202) 225-6211

Brainerd Office

Brainerd City Hall
501 Laurel Street
BrainerdMN 56401

Phone: (218) 355-0862

Cambridge Office

Cambridge City Hall
300 3rd Avenue NE
CambridgeMN 55008

Phone: (763) 310-6208

Chisholm Office

Chisholm City Hall
316 W Lake Street Room 7
ChisholmMN 55719

Phone: (218) 355-0240

Hermantown Office

5094 Miller Trunk Hwy
Suite 900
HermantownMN 55811

Phone: (218) 481-6396

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Wikipedia Entry

Peter Allen Stauber (born May 10, 1966)[1] is an American politician, former professional hockey player, and retired police lieutenant serving as the United States Representative for Minnesota’s 8th congressional district. He was elected to his seat in November 2018.[2] A member of the Republican Party, he previously served as a St. Louis County, Minnesota Commissioner from 2013 to 2019.

Early life and education

Stauber was born on May 10, 1966 in Duluth, Minnesota, and attended Denfeld High School in Duluth.[3] He has a bachelor’s degree in criminology from Lake Superior State University, where he was a star player[4] on the Lake Superior State Lakers men’s ice hockey team.[3][5][6][7] He is credited with helping lead the Lakers to victory in the playoffs and the 1988 NCAA Division I Men’s Ice Hockey Championship game.[8][9] Lake Superior “became the smallest school ever to win college hockey’s biggest prize.”[3] In that game, Stauber took a critical shot, described by opinion columnist Mike Mullen during Stauber’s 2018 candidacy for the U.S. House of Representatives as “risky, arguably crafty, and inarguably illegal,”[3] and by Star Tribune sportswriter John Gilbert in his 1988 story on the championship game as the moment when “Pete Stauber got away undetected when he straight-armed the net off its moorings during a Saints rush with 1:23 to go in regulation.”[10]

After winning the national championship, the team was invited to the White House, where Stauber met President Ronald Reagan, an event he has called a pivotal moment in the formation of his interest in politics.[3]

Career

Professional hockey

In 1990, Stauber signed a multi-year contract with the Detroit Red Wings.[11] The Florida Panthers selected him from the Red Wings in the 1993 NHL Expansion Draft.[12]

Stauber and his brothers, John, Jamie, Bill, Dan, and Robb, all played hockey.[13][6] Together they run an annual Stauber Brothers Military Heroes Hockey Camp, a summer program for children with parents in the military.[14] The six are co-owners of the Duluth Hockey Company, which began as a sporting goods retailer but since 2015 has specialized in hockey-related merchandise.[15][16]

Local politics

Stauber served on the Hermantown City Council for eight years.[17] From 2013 to 2019, he served as a member of the St. Louis County, Minnesota Commission, which includes Duluth.

Political positions

Indigenous issues

A group of Ojibwe tribes from Stauber’s district rebuked him for his attempts to block President Joe Biden’s nomination of Deb Haaland as United States Secretary of the Interior. The Midwest Alliance of Sovereign Tribes also complained about his actions. A member of the House subcommittee on Indigenous Peoples, Stauber cited Haaland’s support of the Green New Deal and opposition to oil drilling. As a member of the House, he will not vote on the nomination.[18]

U.S. House of Representatives

Stauber in 2018

Elections

2018

In June 2018, Donald Trump campaigned for Stauber in his run for U.S. Representative, making his first visit to Minnesota as president and attending his first rally to support a Republican candidate for the House of Representatives in the 2018 general election, visiting Stauber’s hometown of Duluth.[19][20]

The 8th district had an open seat in a previously Democratic-Farmer-Labor (DFL)-held district where the last two elections were close.[20][21][22] Partisan funders on both sides of the aisle reserved “millions” of dollars for advertising in a race widely regarded as a potential Republican pickup of a seat that had been held since 2013 by Rick Nolan.[23] In November, Stauber defeated the DFL nominee, former Nolan aide Joe Radinovich, to become only the fifth person to represent the district in 71 years, and the second Republican to do so. He won primarily by running up his margins in the district’s more conservative western portion.

During his 2018 campaign, Stauber ran on a policy of allowing Medicare to negotiate drug prices, becoming only one of a handful of Republicans to endorse what was primarily a progressive idea.[24] Stauber has since walked back from his campaign pledge.[24]

2020

Stauber was reelected on November 4, 2020, defeating DFL nominee Quinn Nystrom. In December 2020, he filed a motion to support Texas v. Pennsylvania, described as a “seditious abuse of the judicial process” and aimed at invalidating millions of votes in various swing states. The Duluth News Tribune, which had endorsed Stauber, and many other local officials sharply criticized him for the ploy in an open letter to Stauber.[25]

Tenure

According to the McCourt School of Public Policy at Georgetown University, Stauber held a Bipartisan Index Score of 0.7 in the 116th United States Congress for 2019, which placed him 64th out of 435 members.[26] Based on FiveThirtyEight‘s congressional vote tracker at ABC News, Stauber voted with Trump’s stated public policy positions 90.4% of the time,[27] which ranked him average in the 116th United States Congress when predictive scoring (district partisanship and voting record) is used.[28]

On September 30, 2020, Stauber hosted Trump in a visit to his district, attending a rally of about 3,000 people at the Duluth International Airport. Along with two of his Minnesota Republican House colleagues, Stauber rode with Trump on Air Force One.[29] After it was determined that Stauber had interacted with people who tested positive for COVID-19 in Washington D.C., including Trump, Stauber took a Delta flight in violation of Delta’s rules, potentially exposing the other passengers to the virus.[30]

In December 2020, Stauber was one of 126 Republican members of the House of Representatives to sign an amicus brief in support of Texas v. Pennsylvania, a lawsuit filed at the United States Supreme Court contesting the results of the 2020 presidential election, in which Joe Biden defeated[31] incumbent Donald Trump. The Supreme Court declined to hear the case on the basis that Texas lacked standing under Article III of the Constitution to challenge the results of an election held by another state.[32][33][34]

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi issued a statement that called signing the amicus brief an act of “election subversion.” She also reprimanded Stauber and the other House members who supported the lawsuit: “The 126 Republican Members that signed onto this lawsuit brought dishonor to the House. Instead of upholding their oath to support and defend the Constitution, they chose to subvert the Constitution and undermine public trust in our sacred democratic institutions.”[35][36] New Jersey Representative Bill Pascrell, citing section three of the 14th Amendment, called for Pelosi to not seat Stauber and the other Republicans who signed the brief supporting the suit, arguing that “the text of the 14th Amendment expressly forbids Members of Congress from engaging in rebellion against the United States. Trying to overturn a democratic election and install a dictator seems like a pretty clear example of that.”[37]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Electoral history

Republican primary results, 2018
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Pete Stauber 44,814 89.9
RepublicanHarry Welty5,02110.1
Total votes49,835 100.0
Minnesota’s 8th congressional district, 2018
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Pete Stauber 159,364 50.7
Democratic (DFL)Joe Radinovich141,94845.2
IndependenceRay “Skip” Sandman12,7414.0
N/AWrite-ins1560.1
Total votes314,209 100.0
Republican gain from Democratic (DFL)
Minnesota’s 8th congressional district, 2020[41]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Pete Stauber (incumbent) 223,432 56.7
Democratic (DFL)Quinn Nystrom147,85337.6
GrassrootsJudith Schwartzbacker22,1905.6
Write-in2360.1
Total votes393,711 100.0
Republican hold

Personal life

Of German ancestry, Stauber lives in Hermantown, where he and his family belong to the St. Lawrence Catholic Church.[42] While on police duty in 1995, he was shot and lightly wounded in the head when a bullet entered his squad car.[43][17][44]

References

  1. ^ “FILING FEC-1253744”.
  2. ^ Pathé, Simone (June 20, 2018). “Why is Trump Headed to Duluth and Who Is Pete Stauber?”. Roll Call. Retrieved July 27, 2018.
  3. ^ a b c d e Mulen, Mike (March 13, 2018). “Hockey hero and would-be congressman Pete Stauber won’t talk about cheating”. City Pages. Retrieved August 10, 2018.
  4. ^ Gilbert, John (March 31, 1988). “U’ goalie Stauber wins Hobey Baker”. Star Tribune.ProQuest 417870483.
  5. ^ “COLLEGE HOCKEY: N.C.A.A./Friday’s Games; BADGERS PUT FOCUS ON DEFENSE”. New York Times (east coast, late edition). AP. March 26, 1989.ProQuest 427127185.
  6. ^ a b Gilbert, John (April 2, 1988). “A breakaway dream: Stauber vs. Stauber”. Star Tribune.ProQuest 417915863.
  7. ^ Allen, Kevin (October 20, 1988). “Star goalie Stauber makes Minnesota team to beat”. USA Today.ProQuest 306129087.
  8. ^ Powers, John (March 31, 1988). “IT’S A FIRST FOR MAINE, LAKE SUPERIOR A NEW RIVALRY IN FINAL FOUR”. Boston Globe.ProQuest 294420673.
  9. ^ “Overtime nets Lake Superior NCAA hockey championship”. Vancouver Sun. April 4, 1988.ProQuest 243657055.
  10. ^ Gilbert, John (April 3, 1988). “Superior captures crown”. Star Tribune.ProQuest 417913244.
  11. ^ “Wings sign Stauber”. The Province, Vancouver, B.C. June 22, 1990.ProQuest 267368875.
  12. ^ “Red Wings not hurt by expansion”. Detroit News. June 25, 1993.
  13. ^ Gilbert, John (December 25, 1987). “Staubers field complete team with Robb in the nets”. Star Tribune.ProQuest 417850811.
  14. ^ “Hockey camp gives thanks to military while honing skills”. Duluth News Tribune. McClatchey. August 8, 2012.ProQuest 1032667279.
  15. ^ Renalls, Candace (October 4, 2015). “Stauber sports store goes all-hockey”. Duluth News Tribune. Retrieved August 12, 2018.
  16. ^ van Winkle, Mark (January 3, 2017). “Duluth Hockey Company Keeping Skaters Sharp on the Ice”. Fox 21 local. Retrieved August 12, 2018.
  17. ^ a b “Endorsement: Stauber has unbeatable qualifications (ex catherdra editorial endorsement)”. Duluth News Tribune. July 30, 2018.ProQuest 2078949687.
  18. ^ “Tribal leaders blast congressman opposed to Biden nomination”. AP NEWS. January 19, 2021. Retrieved January 19, 2021.
  19. ^ Rogers, Katie; Martin, Jonathan (June 20, 2018). We’re Sending Them the Hell Back,’ Trump Says of Securing the Country’s Borders”. New York Times. Retrieved August 10, 2018.
  20. ^ a b Brody, Sam (June 27, 2018). “Trump is all in on Pete Stauber. Will the 8th District follow suit?”. MinnPost. Retrieved August 10, 2018.
  21. ^ Jamerson, Joshua (August 10, 2018). “In a Challenging Year for House Republicans, Party Sees Hope in Minnesota”. Wall Street Journal. Retrieved August 10, 2018.
  22. ^ Karnowski, Steve (August 10, 2018). “Democrats’ hopes to take House could stumble in Minnesota”. Washington Post. AP. Archived from the original on August 10, 2018. Retrieved August 10, 2018.
  23. ^ Pathe, Simone (August 14, 2015). “Radinovich Will Face Stauber in Top GOP Pickup Opportunity in Minnesota”. Roll Call. Retrieved August 15, 2018.
  24. ^ a b “Two Republicans campaigned on bold drug price reforms, then backpedaled”. STAT. May 24, 2019. Retrieved May 24, 2019.
  25. ^ “Duluth mayor, local officials criticize Stauber for challenging presidential election results”.
  26. ^ “The Lugar Center – McCourt School Bipartisan Index House Scores 116th Congress First Session (2019)” (PDF). Georgetown University. Retrieved May 20, 2020.
  27. ^ “Tracking Congress In The Age Of Trump – Pete Stauber”. ABC News. January 30, 2017. Retrieved May 20, 2020.
  28. ^ “Tracking Congress In The Age Of Trump”. ABC News. January 30, 2017. Retrieved May 20, 2020.
  29. ^ Bierschbach, Briana (October 2, 2020). “Prominent Minnesota Republicans in quarantine, seeking COVID-19 tests after Trump visit”.
  30. ^ “Minnesota Republicans fly Delta home from D.C. after COVID-19 exposure”. Star Tribune. Retrieved October 3, 2020.
  31. ^ Blood, Michael R.; Riccardi, Nicholas (December 5, 2020). “Biden officially secures enough electors to become president”. AP News. Archived from the original on December 8, 2020. Retrieved December 12, 2020.
  32. ^ Liptak, Adam (December 11, 2020). “Supreme Court Rejects Texas Suit Seeking to Subvert Election”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on December 11, 2020. Retrieved December 12, 2020.
  33. ^ “Order in Pending Case” (PDF). Supreme Court of the United States. December 11, 2020. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 11, 2020. Retrieved December 11, 2020.
  34. ^ Diaz, Daniella. “Brief from 126 Republicans supporting Texas lawsuit in Supreme Court”. CNN. Archived from the original on December 12, 2020. Retrieved December 11, 2020.
  35. ^ Smith, David (December 12, 2020). “Supreme court rejects Trump-backed Texas lawsuit aiming to overturn election results”. The Guardian. Retrieved December 13, 2020.
  36. ^ “Pelosi Statement on Supreme Court Rejecting GOP Election Sabotage Lawsuit” (Press release). Speaker Nancy Pelosi. December 11, 2020. Retrieved December 13, 2020.
  37. ^ Williams, Jordan (December 11, 2020). “Democrat asks Pelosi to refuse to seat lawmakers supporting Trump’s election challenges”. TheHill. Archived from the original on December 12, 2020. Retrieved December 12, 2020.
  38. ^ “Featured Members”. Problem Solvers Caucus. Retrieved March 28, 2021.
  39. ^ “Members”. Republican Mains Street Partnership. Archived from the original on August 26, 2018. Retrieved October 4, 2017.
  40. ^ “Membership”. Republican Study Committee. December 6, 2017. Retrieved March 28, 2021.
  41. ^ “Results for All Congressional Districts”. Minnesota Secretary of State. Retrieved November 25, 2020.
  42. ^ Kreger, Mike (March 11, 2014). “A papal keepsake: Hermantown’s Pete Stauber trades headwear with Pope Francis”. Duluth News Tribune. McClatchy.ProQuest 1506067038.
  43. ^ Hollingsworth, Jana (November 11, 2007). “man fires gun, wounds officer”. Duluth News-Tribune.ProQuest 458935613.
  44. ^ Slater, Brady (February 18, 2018). “Stauber ready for his close-up in 8th District race”. Duluth News Tribune.ProQuest 2002766166.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Minnesota’s 8th congressional district

2019–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States representatives by seniority
352nd
Succeeded by